churchman

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churchman

1. a clergyman
2. a male practising member of a church
References in periodicals archive ?
Vatican City (Rome) [Italy], May 21 ( ANI ): Pope Francis on Sunday made an announcement that he would elevate 14 churchmen to the rank of cardinals in the Catholic Church.
As implied by the book's subtitle Theory and Reality, Nakashian aims to contrast the theoretical expectations of clerical behaviour with evidence of English churchmen participating in war.
Tirona said the killing of the two churchmen could be considered as attacks against the Church.
Churchmen are called the worst hypocrites and if my mother heard such, I am sure she would cry in pain,' he said.
As well as the 15 new - cardinals who are under 80 and thus eligible to vote for the next pope - Francis bestowed the honour on five churchmen older than that to honour them for past service.
More details of the allegations against him emerged last night but Father Robinson said the Church must end the secrecy surrounding claims of wrongdoing against churchmen and begin to support the alleged victims.
He elucidates the theological issues clearly and fairly; but he also roots them in the rivalry between historic patriarchates, in which emperors, empresses, and churchmen all played their parts.
After all, Reformed Protestantism was supposed to have been discredited by the Civil Wars and Interregnum, by the Puritan Revolution, and while the Reformed faith might survive among some of the Dissenting churchmen, the Reformed divinity and its adherents were supposed to have been purged from the restored episcopalian church by the Act of Uniformity in 1662.
A solid phalanx of churchmen dressed in white (top right) proceeds down the John Paul Way in the middle of the Cathedral to take up their places at the foot of the massive podium, during the four hour programme which took place before the main service.
Bryan Blundell was an Anglican, but he told John Brekell, one of the dissenting (Presbyterian) ministers, that the Latin inscription above the main entrance which declared that the school was for the children of the established church only had been forced on him against his will by "some zealous churchmen".
Consequently, no churchmen, lay or ordained, were obliged to accept the decision.
Ribordy explores both formal legal strictures of canon law and the extent to which aristocratic practice paid only lip-service to such canons, as well as how much and on what issues contemporary Churchmen upheld, or caved in, on matters of canon law.