churchwarden

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churchwarden

1. Church of England Episcopal Church one of two assistants of a parish priest who administer the secular affairs of the church
2. a long-stemmed tobacco pipe made of clay
References in periodicals archive ?
The churchwardens are pleased to announce that the combined total of donations for the Royal British Legion from the School Remembrance Service and Sunday's services amounted to PS243.52.
At a meeting of the magistrates at Tynemouth in 1788 it was ordered that "the churchwardens should see the constables paid for every Sunday they were on duty examining that no barbers nor hairdressers, nor others, follow their occupations on a Sunday, and that no publicans suffer tippling in their houses during the time of divine service."
Churchwardens Maureen Madden and Margaret Houghton both came in for criticism in Bishop Stephen's report, which described the pair as "confrontational".
In the Church a churchwarden plays a similar dual role.
Indeed, he argues that the keeping of the records played a role in maintaining this small but tightly-knit community: Sir Christopher seems to have read them aloud at various points in the year, demonstrating both the accountability of the churchwardens to the parish and the participation of each individual in the life of the community.
Since then churchwardens' accounts and local borough records have become major sources for studying response to the Reformation.
Drawing on a variety of sources, including records from Queen Elizabeth I's astrologer, doctors, churchwardens and foreign visitors, Elizabeth's London describes what life was like 400 years ago, not for the royal courtiers we so often see in period dramas, but for ordinary Londoners.
Thirty-one extant St Edmund's churchwardens' accounts from 1461 to 1543 show an annual round of processions at Rogation, Ascension, Corpus Christi, and (occasionally) on St Mark's Day (in four years between 1477 and 1484, and in 1521 and 1522).
These factors include increasing diocesan regulation, the development of the office of churchwarden, the growth of written records by churchwardens, parochial fundraising, church architecture, and liturgy and the cult of the saints.
Using account books of confraternities, churchwardens' records, wills, deeds, manorial records, miscellaneous parish documents, inventories, the accounts of Wymondham's Watch and Play (a dramatic society), and Swaffham's Plough Book, Farnhill provides a richly detailed, nuanced examination of how the guilds functioned, who their patrons were, the extent of participation in these organizations, the reasons for their popularity, their contributions to the parish as a social and religious unit, and the impact of the Reformation on them.
The Rev Charles Raven is refusing to co-operate with his churchwardens and has refused to convene a meeting of the district church council.
The Churchwardens were deputed to wait on the Bishop and present their case; they did so, and amongst other reasons given, they urged that the incumbent had preached the same sermon for the third time on last Sunday to them, and it was utterly impossible for the people to get any spiritual comfort or sustenance from such a man.