Ciborium

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Related to ciboria: cruets

Ciborium

 

originally a drinking vessel; in Christian churches a tabernacle placed under the altar canopy. Later the altar canopy itself began to be called the ciborium; it was usually supported by columns and richly ornamented. The vessel or box in which the Communion wafers are placed is also called a ciborium.


Ciborium

 

in Orthodoxy, a type of church receptacle used to hold the consecrated bread of the Eucharist. Ciboria were usually made of silver and modeled in the form of a Christian church in miniature.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ciboria, very abundant in Spain, were not highly disseminated in Portugal during the late medieval period, and were very often mingled in documents with the monstrances or other objects designed to guard the Sacred Host: chests, boxes, safes, small coffers.
Keywords: Fungicide, Ciboria carunculoides, carbendazim, glyphosate.
While all of the throne canopies pictured in these examples are simplified and/or stylized, the domical baldachins over the thrones of King David of the Old Testament and Emperor Theodosius I (reigned 378-95) appearing in the ninth-century manuscript known as the Paris Gregory, each with a detailed depiction of the heavily ornamented posts of the canopy, doubtlessly provide a better idea of how splendid the real objects were, entirely similar in this regard to Byzantine altar ciboria.
Owen Ramsden was a prolific supplier of church plate: chalices, patens and ciboria, alms dishes and crosiers, drawing on both Gothic and Romanesque styles.
Four other chalices, three ciboria, two silver candlesticks and three pattens were also taken in the weekend raid.
Fungal strains Ciboria carunculoides isolate, Cc01, originally isolated from Mulberry, deposited at the
56) Arnolfo di Cambio's two freestanding Gothic ciboria in Rome, marking the high altars in San Paolo fuori le mura and Santa Cecilia in Trastevere, from 1285 and 1293, respectively, are the best known Italian examples (fig.
They even open the tabernacle to withdraw ciboria and then return them.
Neither the seminary nor the archdiocese would sell sacred objects such as chalices, patens, ciboria, tabernacles, [or] altars to museums or private collectors.
Himself a prisoner in communist camps, he told the newly-confirmed young people of the sacrifices that priests had made to celebrate Mass in the camps, using matchboxes for ciboria and small mugs for chalices.
Visitors of other faiths may find this gallery too short on how the chalices, patens, thuribles and ciboria are used in the Mass.