Ciborium


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Ciborium

 

originally a drinking vessel; in Christian churches a tabernacle placed under the altar canopy. Later the altar canopy itself began to be called the ciborium; it was usually supported by columns and richly ornamented. The vessel or box in which the Communion wafers are placed is also called a ciborium.


Ciborium

 

in Orthodoxy, a type of church receptacle used to hold the consecrated bread of the Eucharist. Ciboria were usually made of silver and modeled in the form of a Christian church in miniature.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
References in periodicals archive ?
Females of the genus Sergentomyia usually have armatures and a pigment patch in the ciborium.
95) The only surviving such shrine is the one surmounting the high altar of San Giovanni in Laterano, erected in 1368-70 to house the head-reliquaries of Saints Peter and Paul in the place once occupied by the famed silver ciborium of Emperor Constantine.
The ciborium dates back to about the 1930s and has spent most, if not all, of its life in the church.
At the foot of the Magdalene, he saw a jar of oil, prophetic of "the weakness of all our good," (50) not the ciborium as Grunewald intended, and as more than one generation occupied with the Crucifixion's ecclesiastical and liturgical allusions has seen.
Just as an altar, ciborium, and chalice help define the central ritual of the Christian church, so too does the drinking tube, the cup, and the scratching stick define the lodge rituals.
In one of the more memorable scenes Huguette's religious advisers held a ciborium over Leonarde's head, and she was required to lower herself continual ly so that her head never rose above the eucharist within it.
In architectural terms it's known as a ciborium or a reliquary, the decorated box meant to contain the host or the remains of a saint in a medieval church.
Our Lord and God in a pewter ciborium and not one decent thing in the place.
Ecclesiastical language is full of names for vessels," she tells us: "chalice, ciborium, monstrance, pyx; there must be containers to enclose, keep safe, keep intact, keep protected from the world's contamination the sacred matter.
Huysmans had used the vessel-symbol of the ciborium to evoke the virginal purity of Esther in his novel En Rade (Tresse et Stock, 1887) - a holy object containing the body of Christ, this image would surely have appealed to Bloy (41.
Among the displayed treasures are an Early Byzantine ciborium (altar canopy) dating from about AD 500-600, the only such example from this period to have survived from the Middle East, and opulent Imperial Roman jewelry.