ciguatoxin

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ciguatoxin

[¦sēg·wə¦täk·sən]
(biochemistry)
A toxin produced by the benthic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The first harmful algal species were recorded on Madeira in 2002, and in 2007 the first case of ciguatera fish poisoning was reported for the Selvagens islands (Otero et al., 2010, and references therein).
(d) Including food insecurity, food-borne diseases causing diarrheal illness, and ciguatera ("fish poisoning").
Ciguatera runs like an undercurrent through these communities, not always visible at the surface but having vast economic and public health impacts.
Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a foodborne illness acquired by eating predatory reef fish that have accumulated naturally occurring ciguatoxins found in several dinoflagellate (algae) species through their diet.
In order to describe the epidemiology of lionfish exposures, mechanisms of envenoming and poisoning, presenting manifestations, management, and prevention of injuries and foodborne poisonings, internet search engines, including PubMed, Medline, Ovid, Google[R], and Google Scholar[R], were queried with the key medical subject heading (MESH) words, "lionfish, envenomation; scorpionfish (Scorpaenidae), injuries; poisoning, ciguatera, ciguatoxin." Case reports, case series, epidemiological investigations, and toxicological studies were reviewed; high risk behaviors and occupations for lionfish injuries were identified; and human lionfish-inflicted injuries were stratified by their stages of progression from initial puncture to necrotic ulceration.
candidate used the phrase "climate change" in her epidemiology dissertation, which examined how climate change in Florida had affected ciguatera -- a deadly fish-borne disease that affects the nervous system -- she and her co-author were informed by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection that they couldn't use the words "climate change." They substituted "climate variation."
The percentage of foodborne illnesses caused by nongastroenteric agents ranged from a low of 12% for hepatitis A infection to a high of 100% for scombrotoxicosis and ciguatera.
The most important of these are the ciguatera toxins produced by species in the genus Gambierdiscus.
After ruling out the other possible etiologies, and noting that the patient had eaten fish the day before the symptoms developed, the hospitalist, neurologist, and infectious disease specialist agreed that the most likely diagnosis was ciguatera poisoning.