dyskinesia

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dyskinesia

[‚dis·kə′nē·zhə]
(medicine)
Disordered movements of voluntary or involuntary muscles, particularly those seen in disorders of the extrapyramidal system.
Impaired voluntary movements.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary ciliary dyskinesia is phenotypically and genetically a heterogeneous condition, wherein the primary defect is in the ultrastructures or function of cilia.
Ethmoid mucocele: A new feature of primary ciliary dyskinesia. Pediatr Pulmonol 2010;45(2):197-201.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Diagnosis and standards of care.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder involving number of human organs like upper and lower respiratory tract, spermatozoa in male and fallopian tube in females.
Camner and coworkers first suggested ciliary dyskinesia as the cause of Kartagener syndrome in1975.
Primary ciliary dyskinesia syndrome, or immotile cilia syndrome, is a heterogeneous collection of rare autosomal recessive disorders characterized by defects in the structure and function of cilia, leading to CRS with polyps and recurrent infections.
The primary ciliary dyskinesia also affects spermatozoa, flagella, rendering males sterile.
If associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia, sinusitis and bronchiectasis and infertility in males, it is called Kartagener Syndrome found in 25% of patients (3).
Incidence of congenital heart defects is more (95%) with situs inversus incompletes 25% of individuals with situs inversus have primary ciliary dyskinesia. They present as Kartagener syndrome [1] with the classic triad of situs inversus, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis.
Kartagener syndrome is part of the larger group of disorders called primary ciliary dyskinesias. Approximately one half of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia have situs inversus and, thus, are classified as having Kartagener syndrome.
They address diseases like Marfan and Goodpasture's syndromes, sarcoidosis, autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, scleroderma lung disease, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and their epidemiology, genetic basis and molecular pathogenesis, animal models, clinical presentation, diagnosis, conventional management and treatment strategies, and future therapies and directions.