cinnamic aldehyde


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cinnamic aldehyde

[sə′nam·ik ′al·də‚hīd]
(organic chemistry)
C6H5CH:CHCHO A yellow oil with a cinnamon odor, sweet taste, and a boiling point of 248°C; used in flavors and perfumes.
References in periodicals archive ?
[USPRwire, Wed Aug 07 2019] Natural Cinnamic Aldehyde finds important applications in the food & beverages, perfume, metal & mining industry.
Global Cinnamic Aldehyde Market is anticipated to witness exponential growth in the forecast period.
Contrary to our results, previous researchers reported that adding carvacrol, cinnamic aldehyde, thyme oil or thymol to lamb rations increased the body weight, though their effects were not statistically significant (Ghosh et al, 2010a, b, 2011; Chavez et al., 2008; Simitzis et al., 2008; Unal, 2011).
The RSD of mangiferin, geniposide, liquiritin, epiberberine, coptisine, baicalin, palmatine, berberine, harpagosid, wogonoside, cinnamic acid, cinnamic aldehyde, baicalein, glycyrrhizic acid, and wogonin was 1.94%, 0.72%, 0.88%, 0.54%, 0.62%, 0.97%, 0.93%, 1.35%, 0.98%, 1.33%, 0.67%, 1.40%, 1.08%, 0.96%, and 1.49% which indicated that the developed method had a good precision.
The major components were cinnamic aldehyde (72.87%), cinnamic acid (8.88%), cinnemyl acetate (2.83%), eugonal (1.72%), linalool (1.61%), caiyophellene (1.44%), P-cymene (1.03%), limonene (1.00).
Researchers at the University of Georgia determined the activity of cinnamic aldehyde when it is exposed to high temperatures.
"I had a hunch that this oil, which was prepared with cinnamon and other spices, played a role in preventing the spread of infectious agents to people." Shortly thereafter, his early lab experiments with highly potentized cinnamic aldehyde and coumarin (a variety of cinnamon) proved capable of immunizing chicken embryos from Newcastle disease virus and later was found to be effective against avian flu H9, Sendai virus, and herpes simplex 1.
In order to better understand the conditions that may affect the antimicrobial activity of plant-derived phenolics, researchers at the University of Georgia determined the activity of cinnamic aldehyde when it is exposed to high temperatures.
Researchers used a water extract of the herb standardised to contain specific levels of trans-cinnamic acid and cinnamic aldehyde.
Other allergens showing positive reactions in more than 5% of patients were sodium gold thiosulfate, neomycin sulfate, cobalt chloride, propylene glycol, lanolin alcohol, and cinnamic aldehyde. Makeup and lipsticks were the most common sources of allergic reactions.
Opdyke (1976) reported that three aldehydes (cinnamic aldehyde, phenylacetaldehyde and citral) were shown to be sensitizers in a human maximization test; however, essential oils that contain significant amounts of each material did not induce sensitization [25].