circle-to-land maneuver

circle-to-land maneuver

A maneuver initiated by the pilot to align the aircraft with a runway for landing when a straight-in landing from an instrument approach is not possible or is not desirable. At tower-controlled airports, this maneuver is made only after ATC (air traffic control) authorization has been obtained and the pilot has established required visual reference to the airport.
References in periodicals archive ?
And if the landing approach includes a circle-to-land maneuver, we're setting ourselves up for one of winter flying's classic traps.
The FAA is proposing that each instrument approach procedure (IAP) that includes a circle-to-land maneuver be evaluated by asking the following questions:
Landing straight in on Runway 27 avoids a circle-to-land maneuver with a lot of wind.
Everyone trains for that circle-to-land maneuver from an instrument approach, but there's also an occasional need to fly circling departures.
At 1104, ATC advised the pilot to expect the ILS approach to Runway 2 at the Tweed-New Haven Airport (KHVN) in New Haven, Conn., with a circle-to-land maneuver to Runway 20.
We can't safely fly a circle-to-land maneuver with tolerances that loose, especially at night or in poor visibility.
Even in the daylight, the terrain is too close to the runway to permit circling in the low visibilities that would require you to be flying a circle-to-land maneuver.
If a transition to another runway is desired, a circle-to-land maneuver becomes the only option in the absence of published side-step minimums.
In a circle-to-land maneuver, you must maintain circling minimums until you are in a position to make a normal rate of descent to the touchdown point.
Practicing the circle-to-land maneuver during your recent IPC or other review with your double-I can and will help build confidence and competency for the prospect of needing to fly that maneuver for-real.
The circle-to-land maneuver is the proverbial "enough rope": Give it to a pilot who isn't careful and he'll hang himself on an unseen tower just when he thinks he's about to pull off another successful flight.