circular saw

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circular saw

a power-driven saw in which a circular disc with a toothed edge is rotated at high speed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

circular saw

[′sər·kyə·lər ′sȯ]
(mechanical engineering)
Any of several power tools for cutting wood or metal, having a thin steel disk with a toothed edge that rotates on a spindle.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

circular saw

circular saw
A power-operated saw in the form of a circular steel blade with teeth along the perimeter. Also see table saw.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I want to buy a hand-held circular saw, but I'm confused by all the choices.
Police use a circular saw to raid a house in Colwyn Bay, leaving a dog to wonder what's going on (top left).
For later tractors with rear PTO shafts, or even rear-mounted belt pulleys, a number of manufacturers offered rear-mounted circular saws. Unlike their front-mounted counter-parts, these saws were generally mounted only during firewood season.
According to Mike Goreman, cordless product manager with Columbia, Md.-based DeWalt, approximately 40 percent of trim and finish carpenters use cordless circular saws. He estimates that only 10 percent of framers work with cordless saws because most need the power of a corded tool for heavy cutting.
Here's some sage advice that circular saw blade users can really sink their teeth into.
Circular saws brazed with tips of hard alloy materials such as tungsten carbide (TC) or polycrystalline diamond (PCD) are used for cutting solid wood and wood-based composites because of their good tool wear resistance.
These range from the standard circular saw to the compound mitre saw, which can also be used to cut plastic, alloys and nonferrous metals.
Consumer Product Safety Commission have announced a recall of 180,000 Makita circular saws. According to the CPSC, the saws' lower blade guard can jam, bringing the user in contact with the saw blade.
Installers generally can choose between circular saws with fiber cement blades, which can cut several pieces at a time, or fiber cement shears, which can cut only one piece at a time but can make scroll cuts, curves, and holes.