Cistern

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Related to cisternal: cisternal puncture

cistern

[′sis·tərn]
(anatomy)
A closed, fluid-filled sac or vesicle, such as the subarachnoid spaces or the vesicles comprising the dictyosomes of a Golgi apparatus.
(civil engineering)
A tank for storing water or other liquid.
(geology)
A hollow that holds water.

Cistern

A tank used to store rainfall that has been collected from a roof or some other catchment area, usually located underground. The water is generally used for watering lawns and gardens, washing cars, and similar uses, but it can also be used for flushing toilets and, with treatment, for all other uses. Cisterns help conserve water and prevent pollution of nearby streams from runoff.

cistern

An artificial reservoir or tank for storing water at atmospheric pressure (such as rain-water collected from a roof) for use when required.
References in periodicals archive ?
Binary Logistic Regression of variables affecting Mortality Variables P OR 95% Confidence Interval Lower Upper Cisternal Status 0.001 28.517 12.469 64.760 (Good or Bad) Brainstem Distortion 0.001 11.684 5.642 24.199 (Yes or No) Midline Shift Group 0.000 8.942 4.269 18.733 (Lower or Higher) OR= Odds Ratio, CI= Confidence Interval.
Demyelinating plaques may involve the trigeminal nuclei, the fascicular fibers in the brainstem, or extend into the root entry zone of the cisternal segment (7).
Effect of different milking intervals on the composition of cisternal and alveolar milk in dairy cows.
[sup][4],[5] However, previous reports have discussed alternative approaches for cisternal puncture.
Typically, if a facial palsy is localized to the cisternal or intracanalicular segments of the facial nerve or the pontine nuclei, contrast-enhanced MRI is indicated.
[12.] Madarazo I, renteria JA, paredes G,et al: Daigosis of intraventricular and cisternal cysticercosis by computerised tomography with positive intraventricular contrast medium.
(35, 36) Evidence of cerebral edema will often be present and may include midline shifts, cisternal and ventricular compression, and hydrocephalus, with hydrocephalus more common in children than adults.
We can explain the mechanism of low milk fat levels that the milking machine seizes cisternal milk but not alveolar milk, where most of the fat is found (Thomas et al., 2001).
The concerns regarding epidural analgesia in this case involve a number of possibilities: the theoretical risk that infusions of large volumes of local anaesthetic could increase ICP by a secondary compression effect on cerebrospinal fluid; the risk that dural puncture in a patient with recent intracranial haemorrhage may not actually lead to brainstem herniation but may cause brain shifting, which with loss of cisternal cushioning, might tear fragile fibrin plugs and result in renewed intracranial bleeding.
Ultrastructural changes at this stage paralleled the biochemical findings in that the mitochondria were dramatically altered in size and shape and there was extensive loss of the basal plasma membrane infoldings together with complex cisternal proliferation in proximal tubular cells.
Their criteria include a GCS[greater than or equal to]13, midline shift <l0mm, absence of CSF basal cisternal effacement, and absence of other associated intraparenchymal lesions.