citation

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citation

1. Law
a. an official summons to appear in court
b. the document containing such a summons
2. Law the quoting of decided cases to serve as guidance to a court

Citation

famous horse in history of thoroughbred racing. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1273]
See: Horse
References in periodicals archive ?
table " border="1" 0" " Proportion (times) After the revolution Before the revolution Title 139.2 377408 2711 Number of citable documents 59.6 1.79 0.
These articles are searchable and citable by their Digital Object Identifier (DOI).
And once a manuscript has been accepted for publication through the peer-review process, it is posted as an Early Online Release with its final Digital Object Identifier (DOI) within days of that acceptance, making it available to the community and fully citable as a reference almost immediately.
The high-quality, citable information that we provide comes from sources that may never appear in a list of Google results.
down, and the editors require citable evidence to include a new
A journal's impact factor for a given year is calculated as the citations during that year (published in journals indexed in Clarivate Analytics' Web of Science) to all articles published by the journal in the previous two years, divided by number of articles published in the journal in the previous two years deemed to be "citable" by Clarivate Analytics.
The impact factor of a journal is calculated by dividing the number of citations received by a journal within a specific year by the citable articles published in that journal in the previous two years (5).
The impact factor, released by Thomson Reuters, is a quantitative measure of the performance of a journal and is calculated by dividing the number of citations received during a 1-year period by the number of citable items published during the previous 2 years.
In contrast to the official journal impact factor, CiteScore recognizes all articles as potentially citable, including editorials and letters to the editor, which are usually cited less often.
Citation impact and other metrics are calculated on the basis of 'citable items' in Web of Science (WoS) and 'citable documents' in Scopus (Nelhans, 2014).