citizenship

(redirected from citizenships)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

citizenship

see CITIZEN.

Citizenship

 

a person’s affiliation with a given state, as a result of which he is covered by the rights and duties established by the legislation of the state with the assurance of state protection for his rights. In states with a monarchical form of government the term “subject” is used.

The procedure for acquiring or losing citizenship is regulated by the legislation of each state. As a rule, the legislation of all states distinguishes between the acquisition of citizenship by birth (filiation) and by naturalization. In deciding the question of the acquisition of citizenship by birth, two principles are used. The first is the national principle—the so-called blood right (jus sanguinis), according to which a child’s citizenship depends on the parents’ citizenship, regardless of the place of birth. Under the territorial principle—the so-called right of the soil (jus soli), citizenship is based on the place of birth and is not connected to the parents’ citizenship. The legislation of most bourgeois states combines these two principles with the observance of certain mandatory conditions.

In the socialist countries existing laws on citizenship provide for full equality of citizens, regardless of race or nationality, and equal rights for men and women. When citizenship is given by birth, the principle of blood right is applied. If one of the child’s parents is a foreigner, citizenship is usually determined by agreement between the parents.

In the USSR a single union citizenship has been established: every citizen of a union republic is a citizen of the USSR, and citizens of one union republic enjoy equal rights with the citizens of another union republic when they are on its territory. Soviet citizenship is granted to foreigners who petition for it by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR or by the presidium of the supreme soviet of the union republic in which they reside. Renunciation of Soviet citizenship can be authorized only by the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. When parents change their citizenship, either becoming Soviet citizens or renouncing their Soviet citizenship, the citizenship of their children who have not reached 14 years of age is changed accordingly. The citizenship of children 14 to 18 years old cannot be changed without their consent.

The marriage of a male or female citizen of the USSR to a person who is not a Soviet citizen does not entail a change of citizenship. Deprivation of Soviet citizenship can occur only by the issuing in each case of a special decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR or by sentence of a court in instances provided for under the law.

Persons who are residing in the USSR but who are not citizens of the USSR and do not have corroboration of their citizenship in another state are considered persons without citizenship. They have the same rights and duties as citizens of the USSR, except the right to vote, the right to be elected, and the military obligation.

Questions of changing citizenship in other socialist countries are regulated according to similar principles.

REFERENCES

Shevtsov, V. S. Sovetskoe grazhdanstvo. Moscow, 1965.
Chernichenko, S. V. Mezhdunarodno-pravovye voprosy grazhdanstva. Moscow, 1968.

N. P. FARBEROV

References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequently, the BI confirmed her reacquisition of Philippine citizenship.
The SC explained that once Philippine citizenship is renounced because of naturalization in a foreign country, one cannot be considered a Filipino citizen unless and until his or her allegiance to the Republic of the Philippines is reaffirmed.
CTP also applied for an interim order to prevent those with such citizenships from buying property, establish businesses or vote.
The post Party seeks to overturn citizenships granted in north appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
In 2014, around 890,000 persons acquired citizenship of a Member State of the European Union (EU), down from 981,000 in 2013.
The largest group acquiring citizenship of an EU Member State in 2014 was citizens of Morocco (92,700 persons, of which 88% acquired citizenship of Spain, Italy or France), ahead of citizens of Albania (41,000, 96% acquired citizenship of Greece or Italy), Turkey (37,500, 60% acquired German citizenship), India (35,300, almost two-thirds acquired British citizenship), Ecuador (34,800, 94% acquired Spanish citizenship), Colombia (27,800, 90% acquired Spanish citizenship) and Pakistan (25,100, around half acquired British citizenship).
8 citizenships per 1000 resident population with just 0.
According to the latest figures of Eurostat released on Monday, Bulgaria granted citizenship to 900 foreign nationals in 2014.
Union law, through the provisions on Union citizenship, indirectly influences the nationality rules of the Member States.
nationals, "homegrown" or otherwise, be stripped of their citizenship if they are "engaging in or purposefully and materially supporting hostilities against the United States.