civil list


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civil list

(in Britain) the annuities voted by Parliament for the support of the royal household and the royal family

Civil List

 

in monarchical governments the sum allotted in the state budget for the monarch’s personal expenses and the maintenance of the royal household. In constitutional monarchies the civil list is usually established by parliament for the duration of a monarch’s reign. In some countries, such as the Netherlands, the list is regulated by the constitution.

References in periodicals archive ?
The total cost of the Queen's Civil List, which pays for the running of the Royal Household including staff salaries, was Au14.2 million in 2009, up Au300,000.
Until the financial crisis created by the American War of Independence, Parliament took little interest in the civil administration of the "King's Executive," most notably accounts of expenditure from the civil list, which provided for the financial needs of the monarch, both personal and those of his executive government [Chester, 1981, p.
It also revealed that the Queen raided the reserve fund by 6 million pounds to supplement the Civil List.
George II had received various revenues, known as Civil List revenues, of which the rents from the Crown Lands were one.
The Civil List is the sum approved by the Commons to meet the official expenses of the Queen's household.
"I can announce that with the full agreement of the Queen, the Civil List will remain frozen at pounds 7.9 million for the coming year and I will propose a new means of consolidated support for Her Majesty for the future at a later date."
The Royal households have agreed that, in future, Civil List expenditure will be subject to the same audit scrutiny as other Government expenditure through the National Audit Office and the Commons Public Accounts Committee.
In a response to a request for information, a spokesman for shadow chancellor George Osborne has said funds for health and international development obligations would be safeguarded, as they have already indicated, but there would be no assurances for other areas including the Civil List.
The land may belong to the Crown Estates but, in 1760, King George III gave the Crown Estates to the state in return for the civil list. So the Crown Estates no longer belong to the monarch but to the country or, in other words, the Government.
They receive far too much from the civil list and have more hangers-on than you can count and are doing nothing whatsoever to get rid of them.
Sophie and husband Prince Edward get pounds 141,000 of taxpayers' cash from the Civil List.
They do not receive any money from the Civil List and have been plagued by financial problems during their 19-year marriage.