Cladocera

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Related to cladoceran: water fleas

Cladocera

[kla′däs·ə·rə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of small, fresh-water branchiopod crustaceans, commonly known as water fleas, characterized by a transparent bivalve shell.

Cladocera

 

a suborder of branchiopod crustaceans. They have a pair of large second antennae, which consist of two branches and serve as organs of motion. The torso is covered with bivalve chitinous shells. An alternation of sexual and asexual reproduction, parthenogenesis, is characteristic of the Cladocera. They are from 0.25 to 10 mm long. There are about 380 species. They are largely freshwater animals, living in various bodies of water, from small pools to large lakes. Very few live in the seas. Cladocera serve as food for many fish (smelt, vendace, bleaks, some types of white fish, and others). Certain Cladocera (daphnia) are used as artificially raised food for fish farms and aquariums. Cladocera are good indicators of water pollution, since the majority of Cladocera live in almost clean or slightly polluted reservoirs.

References in periodicals archive ?
In 1997-2005, the abundance and biomass of copepods decreased up to two times, the abundance and biomass of cladocerans almost two times (Fig.
Copepods have a very different lifestyle from the cladocerans and rotifers in that they reproduce sexually.
Utilization of the exotic cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi by juvenile fishes in an Illinois floodplain lake.
Macrozooplankton communities typical of these reservoirs include small-bodied cladocerans, calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, with copepod nauplii abundant in all seasons.
Another index, the ratio of calanoid to cyclopoid copepods plus cladoceran species, also classified Lake Texoma as eutrophic.
Cladoceran densities, day-to-day variability in food selection by smelt, and the birth-rate-compensation hypothesis.
2012) we found that Daphnia cucullata is among dominants in the Cladoceran community of Latvian salmonid lakes.
Because no Bythotrephes individuals were found on these sampling dates at these sites, data on Leptodora kindti from these samples are included for comparison of Cercopagis with another predatory cladoceran (Table 1).
Our current water quality standards were developed from information on the pollution sensitivities of many common freshwater organisms, such as the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), and a small crustacean, the cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia).