claim


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claim

Law a document under seal, issued in the name of the Crown or a court, commanding the person to whom it is addressed to do or refrain from doing some specified act.

Claim

 

in Soviet civil law, a demand by a creditor that a debtor provide payment of a debt, compensation for losses incurred, or payment of a penalty or that the debtor eliminate defects in products delivered, an object sold, or work performed. In the case of socialist organizations, the dispute shall be turned over to an arbitration tribunal before a claim is submitted. Organizations and citizens that are clients of communications and transportation agencies cannot bring suit against these agencies without first presenting the claim to the transportation or communications agency in question. When there are defects in goods that have a stated guarantee period and are sold through retail trade organizations, claims are submitted within such periods, which begin from the Gay of sale.

claim

[′klām]
(mining engineering)
References in classic literature ?
It's in spots, but I wouldn't be none surprised if some of them claims yielded as high as fifty thousand.
This they claimed was ten ounces; but when they filled a pan of dirt to prove the lie, they washed out twelve ounces.
He notified the Western Union confidentially, of course, that its case could not be proven, and that "Bell was the original inventor of the telephone." The best policy, he suggested, was to withdraw their claims and make a settlement.
But Gray could never forget that he had seemed to be, for a time, so close to the golden prize; and seven years after he had been set aside by the Western Union agreement, he reappeared with claims that had grown larger and more definite.
On they came, a motley array, "some in rags, some on nags, and some in velvet gowns." One of them claimed to have done wonders with an iron hoop and a file in 1867; a second had a marvellous table with glass legs; a third swore that he had made a telephone in 1860, but did not know what it was until he saw Bell's patent; and a fourth told a vivid story of having heard a bullfrog croak via a telegraph wire which was strung into a certain cellar in Racine, in 1851.
More than forty instances of this imitative habit were shown at the trial, and he was severely scored by the judge, who accused him of "deliberately falsifying the facts." His ruling passion of imitation, apparently, was not diminished by the loss of his telephone claims, as he came to public view again in 1903 as a trailer of Marconi.
"On the 22d of June he sold his dog--said 'Dern a dog, anyway, where you're just starting off on a rattling bully pleasure tramp through the summer woods and hills--perfect nuisance--chases the squirrels, barks at everything, goes a-capering and splattering around in the fords-- man can't get any chance to reflect and enjoy nature-- and I'd a blamed sight ruther carry the claim myself, it's a mighty sight safer; a dog's mighty uncertain in a financial way- -always noticed it--well, GOOD-by, boys--last call--I'm off for Tennessee with a good leg and a gay heart, early in the morning.'"
I saw him an hour ago-- he's off for Tennessee early tomorrow morning--as usual; said he calculated to get his claim through and be off before night-owls like me have turned out of bed.
He is as well acquainted with his own claims, as you can be with Harriet's.
Similarly, an auto roadside assistance claim, homeowner's glass claim, or a "one-shot" medical only workers' compensation claim should be relatively easy to identify during the triage process.
Like many propositions that look irresistible at first glance, claims outsourcing has proven a compelling but elusive goal for many insurers.
The Sixth Circuit Is a Good Place to Raise a Work-Product Claim