clam worm

clam worm

[′klam ‚wərm]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for a number of species of dorsoventrally flattened annelid worms composing the large family Nereidae in the class Polychaeta; all have a distinct head, with numerous appendages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paddle worm Lepidonotus squamatus Scale worm Alitta succinea Clam worm Drilonereis sp.
For simplicity's sake, I'll use the term "clam worm" from here on out.
Because the timing for each subgroup of clam worm might vary a smidge, it will be a long time before anybody nails down exactly when the swarm will occur from year to year.
With a limited sample to work with, it appears the best approach to fishing these would be either a small jig, with a darker reddish head and a lighter pink or red body, or even better a "clam worm fly." There are plenty of traditional worm fly patterns on the web, but until this particular swarm is better understood it makes sense to show up with a variety of impressionistic variations, with a few different sizes, weights and hues.
Since clam worms are widely distributed around the world, it's not shocking that they are found in Florida.
In an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers compare the bloodworm's jaws to those of the clam worm, Nereis limbata, a sand- and mud-dwelling scavenger.
Using a variety of tests, Stucky and his coworkers found that the properties of the clam worm's jaw vary with its zinc content.
The clam worm, which scavenges food, may not require jaws as hard as those of the bloodworm, which thrusts its jaws into prey to inject venom.
In the future, notes materials researcher Mehmet Sarikaya of the University of Washington in Seattle, investigators might discover more specifically how the zinc-based cross-linking occurs in clam worms and why the animals rely on zinc rather than on another metal.