clamping


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clamping

[′klamp·iŋ]
(electronics)
The introduction of a reference level that has some desired relation to a pulsed waveform, as at the negative or positive peaks. Also known as direct-current reinsertion; direct-current restoration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
SPRING CLAMPS: These are the fastest helpers for holding your work in place or doing light-pressure clamping. They're cheap, too: Most cost less than $5.
The clamping unit is vertical while the injection unit can be either vertical (PVV) or horizontal (PVH).
Adjustment of the clamping force during machining requires the control system to be responsive to the change in workpiece dimensions.
The primary function of a clamping system is to hold the board tightly in place to provide optimum gasketing during printing process.
The authors recommended 3 minutes' delay from delivery to clamping with the infant at the same level as the mother ([+ or -] 10 cm).
Clamping can be performed from one end or both, and jaws can be positioned at the ends or anywhere along the pipe.
"The length of clamping time is still primarily a function of the glue," Uhling explains, saying some glues cure in only a minute while others take 20 minutes or more.
Inside the housing of the safety system several wedge shaped clamping jaws surround the shaft.
Edge Grip low-profile clamps apply horizontal and vertical clamping force against the workpiece to pull it down onto the table and allow maximum cutter access to the workpiece surface.
A team of researchers working in Guatemala says it has found a painless, no-cost means of enriching babies' blood with iron at birth: delaying slightly the clamping of a newborn's umbilical cord.
A range of die clamping systems is offered for presses and injection molding systems, and has been supplemented with a series of robust wedge clamping elements.