clapboard

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clapboard

(klăb`ərd), board used for the exterior finish of a wood-framed building and attached horizontally to the wood studs. The word, in its original and strict use, refers to a product of New England; boards of similar type made elsewhere are termed siding. Clapboards are particularly characteristic of the United States, having been steadily used since the earliest years of the colonial settlements. Each clapboard overlaps the one below it, leaving a few inches exposed to the weather. White pine is considered the best wood for clapboards; cedar, cypress, and spruce are also used.

clapboard

One of a series of boards used for siding, with a tapered cross section, most commonly called beveled siding. See also: Wood

clapboard

[′kla‚bərd]
(materials)
A board, thicker at one edge than the other, used to cover exterior walls.

clapboard, bevel siding, lap siding

A wood siding commonly used as an exterior covering on a building of frame construction; applied horizontally and overlapped, with the grain running lengthwise; thicker along the lower edge than along the upper.
References in periodicals archive ?
Houston, a prominent local merchant and a member of the board, was appointed the first superintendent of the clapboard courthouse, he immediately cleared out the room used to store firewood.
The original eastern white pine clapboards are still found on some homes, as are floorboards measuring 18 to 20 inches wide.
Clapboard siding on homes from the 1700s is still seen in some parts of New England.
Monogram 46L panels are 16'8" for Double 4" Clapboard and 16' for Double 5" Dutchlap.
Phase II will involve replacing the clapboards and windows and painting the east side of the building.
Michel got it during the first part of the renovations, when, after clapboards were removed to be replaced with lower-maintenance concrete impregnated siding, a musket ball was found in the side of the church.
Red cedar clapboards and shingles should be painted or stained, and such paint and/or stain must be renewed regularly.
It was in 1861 - while some Millbury men answered the call to preserve the Union - that some other Millbury men quarried the granite blocks for the school's foundation, fashioned the red cedar clapboards to keep out the elements, and erected the bell tower to call scholars to their lessons.