class E amplifier

class E amplifier

[‚klas ′ē ′am·plə‚fī·ər]
(electronics)
A power amplifier that employs a single transistor driven to act as a switch, and an output filter selected to bring the drain voltage to zero at the instant the transistor is switched on.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A class E amplifier is used as the general circuit topology of a power transmitter in a WPT system on the HF bands because it can obtain high output power and theoretically 100% power added efficiency (PAE) with a simple design [7].
Later chapters address high efficiency broadband class E amplifiers, Doherty architectures, the conflicting objectives of low noise amplifiers, the distributed amplification and circuit implementation of microwave gallium arsenide FET-distributed amplifiers, and CMOS amplifiers for ultra-wideband transmission.
In class E amplifiers, an efficiency improvement is achieved by realizing the on/off switching operation with special current and voltage waveforms so that high voltage and high current do not exist at the same time.