class structure


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Related to class structure: class struggle

class structure

the general pattern of CLASS differences and relations within a society See also CLASS FORMATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
159; see also James Cronin, "Politics, Class Structure and the Enduring Weakness of British Social Democracy," Journal of Social History 16 (1982-3): 123-420.
This third volume in the series looks at rural development 1949-2009, market transition and changes in the rural class structure, post-earthquake China and its dilemmas in development, and recent rural developments.
Taken together, the contributions that make up the main body of the text reinforce the advantages of taking a comparative approach to East Asian Studies, as gender and class structure are far from uniform throughout the region.
as the engine of democracy, economic growth, and upward social mobility, while the other casts public schooling as a cynical mechanism for reproducing the class structure by "instill[ing] in future workers the respect for law and authority necessary in .
There is also discussion of how economic factors shaped the community and its class structure. Black and white and color historical and contemporary photos, illustrations, and maps are included.
The articles continue this theme, demonstrating how battles over education, feminism, class structure and national identity were fought in print.
Herrnstein and Charles Murray, The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life (New York, 1994); Peter Brimelow, Alien Nation: Common Sense about America's Immigration Disaster (New York, 1995).
They discuss the importance of institutional entrepreneurs, the role of culture in economic action, the role of superstitions and belief systems in self-governance, Austrian theories of disasters, Austrian business cycle theory, macroeconomic theory and systems theory, institutional theory and Austrian theory, the Austrian approach to class structure, governance and institutional selection in autocracies (Singapore and the United Arab Emirates), and the use of drones in foreign interventions and the US.
Harris (history, DeVry U.) presents 22 papers from the 2008 conference of the multidisciplinary Global Studies Association of North America, which brought together scholars and activists from the United States, Canada, and Mexico in order to focus on the theme "The Nation in the Global Era: Conflict and Transition." The papers are presented in thematic sections on the transnational class structure and the state, the political economy of globalization, national identity and developments, and environmental impacts.
In this work of political history, chronological and thematic chapters chart the ideological relationship between progressives and radicals in the US between 1900 and 1924, looking especially at how progressives were influenced by the ideas of socialists, syndicalists, anarchists, and other radicals who opposed the state, capitalism, and class structure. The book is concerned with four types of progressivism: national progressivism and questions of political economy and regulating business; social reform and help for the poor and immigrants; agitation of farmers, miners, and loggers; and electoral reform.
The articles also emphasize themes of interest to social historians such as gender, class structure and colonialism.