classify

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Related to classificatory: classification, cognitive

classify

[′klas·ə·fī]
(science and technology)
To sort into groups that have common properties.
References in periodicals archive ?
The shift in census enumerators' classificatory decisions from 1910 to 1920 is revealing of the consequences of U.
including prepubertal animals, reveals that the most discriminant variables were, in order of classificatory power:
In "Brain Death without Definitions," I defend a realist account of life and death, on which the biological facts that determine whether something is alive or dead are (at least in determinate cases) independent of our linguistic and classificatory practices.
It was found, for example, that the new spatial relationships children made as they grew older also changed the classificatory, seriational, numerical, and temporal relationships they made.
This is because the majority of the various theories of fictionality are based on a classificatory understanding of concepts, an understanding that I now wish to problematize.
Such an approach falls within the social constructivist perspective and interprets emerging divisions among the poor as an outcome of classificatory struggles within a society.
But now we are at a breaking point, for the digitization of knowledge makes it inescapably clear that most of the classificatory schemes that we care about are invented, not discovered.
While the "future of the United States" seems secure, its health and welfare are gravely affected by the divisiveness and rancor surrounding the mere public mention of racial categories, much less its use in public policy circles for classificatory purposes.
Paling's own notion of a classificatory horizon "represents a convergence of ideas from related fields that, taken together, can provide a theoretical framework for studying rhetorical aspects of classification" and "a better understanding of the material and cultural limits that act on the representations in our classificatory systems.
It is a theory about how classificatory schemes come to contribute to the epistemic reliability of explanatory and inductive practices (Boyd, 1982, 1983, 1991, 1999, 2000).
While historians should read Poole for her contribution to the history of representations and for providing a more variegated picture of the puritan, one must nevertheless question her own lapses into classificatory vagueness: can Familists really be considered "puritan," for example, in the same way that the authors of the Martin Marprelate tracts were "puritan"?
If no gender discrimination existed in employment compensation, then one would expect approximately the same classificatory ability from the classification procedure regardless of the inclusion or omission of salary as an attribute variable.