classify


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classify

[′klas·ə·fī]
(science and technology)
To sort into groups that have common properties.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally speaking, authorized executive branch agencies are to classify information in accordance with standing classified information policy.
As scientists discover and classify living things, they now estimate that 80 percent of all animals are insects.
If a condition listed as SWARMP in the Cycle 5 report has not been addressed prior to Cycle 6 filing, the professional has no choice but to classify it as Unsafe.
Neville Letserich, director of product marketing at EMC, stated that, "Organizations need to be able to classify content, and this requires a level of detailed information about data that other storage management applications can't provide." ESG's Marrone-Hurley noted that "Documentum provides more than static attributes and that's where they differ [from some other products]." CSS's policy engine assigns specific tags to the files based on preset attributes and then places the content on the appropriate storage device and automates the process of moving it from tier to tier as needed.
Very young children may classify objects that are familiar to them such as pets, type of clothes, body parts, and so forth.
"Decision trees" help researchers classify samples by offering sequential tests of individual attributes.
FBI officials routinely classify all information gathered during a "counterterrorism" investigation, including even routine newspaper clippings.
In addition, it would set up a procedure to make it easier for the public to challenge any decision to classify information.
Several decades ago, the International Committee of Foundry Technical Associations addressed the need to classify casting defects and subsequently published the International Atlas of Casting Defects.
Once experts classify lip patterns, they record them by noting the combinations of groove types found in each print.
"I expected that there would be considerable scientific outcry of support here," says NOAA's Wolff, "but it hasn't come about because the oceans don't have much of a constituency in this town [Washington] and because a lot of scientists interested in oceanography are dependent on the Navy for their livelihood, so they don't dare say anything." But, comments Gary Hill of USGS in Reston, Va., "if the military decides it is necessary to classify NOAA's Seabeam activities, the logical next question is, what about the data being collected by academics?"