clavicle


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clavicle

Anatomy
1. either of the two bones connecting the shoulder blades with the upper part of the breastbone
2. the corresponding structure in other vertebrates
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

clavicle

[′klav·ə·kal]
(anatomy)
A bone in the pectoral girdle of vertebrates with articulation occurring at the sternum and scapula.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lateral end of the clavicle is fixed to the coracoid process by the coracoclavicular ligament, having the lateral trapezoid and medial conoid parts.
Posterior dislocations may cause some symptoms due to compression of head of clavicle on contiguous structures and injuries or lacerations may occur due to direct effect or trauma.
In the 78 subjects, there are totally 9 Spine, 12 Femur, 28 Clavicle, 6 Extremity & Ankle, 12 Extremity & Hand and 11 Knee bones X-Ray scan images.
For measurements, the most prominent point of the sternal end of the clavicle (SEC) on anterior view and the most prominent point of the acromial end of the clavicle (AEC) were identified as the reference point.
Standard treatment for this fracture pattern is nonoperative, using an armsling or figure-of-eight bandage for external fixation.[4] Conservatively displaced fractures are noted to have a higher incidence of nonunion in between 10% and 15% and even when they do unite, often result in an unsightly cosmetic deformity in the center of the clavicle, shoulder dropping, shoulder discomfort, and patient dissatisfaction.[5],[6] The amount of pain and disability during the first 3 weeks of conservative treatment has been underrated.
A physical examination demonstrated swelling around both ends of the right clavicle, but neurovascular symptoms were not observed.
In the 2nd century, AD, Galen of Pergamon transposed his observations made on monkeys onto humans and claimed that the cephalic vein (Galen's humeral vein) "arose" from the external jugular vein and encircling the clavicle "ran towards the periphery" [8].
The patient was indicated for surgical intervention and underwent an arthroscopic debridement of his partial thickness (Ellman grade 1A) supraspinatus tear, subacromial decompression, biceps tenotomy, and open distal clavicle excision.
The coracoid process is a key connection between the scapula and the clavicle and an important anchor in the coracoacromial arch; it is part of the superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC) as proposed by Goss et al.
However, there are concerns regarding complications related to metal subsidence with loss of CC reduction and risk of fractures in the coracoid process or in the clavicle despite the strong fixation strength, the minimal invasiveness, and the decreased morbidity with which this technique is associated.