claw


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Related to claw: Cat's Claw, bear claw, claw toe

claw

1. a curved pointed horny process on the end of each digit in birds, some reptiles, and certain mammals
2. a corresponding structure in some invertebrates, such as the pincer of a crab
3. Botany the narrow basal part of certain petals and sepals

claw

[klȯ]
(anatomy)
A sharp, slender, curved nail on the toe of an animal, such as a bird.
(design engineering)
A fork for removing nails or spikes.
(invertebrate zoology)
A sharp-curved process on the tip of the limb of an insect.
References in classic literature ?
With that he took his trembling hands, which were like the claws of a great bird, out of my hair; and put on a pair of spectacles, not at all ornamental to his inflamed eyes.
This is the hour of pride and power, Talon and tush and claw.
It had been fighting, and manifestly had had a savage opponent, for its throat was torn away, and its belly was slit open as if with a savage claw.
It was a continual scratching, as if made by a huge claw, a powerful tooth, or some iron instrument attacking the stones.
A yellow claw the very same that had dawed together so much wealth- poked itself out of the coach- window, and dropt some copper coins upon the ground; so that, though the great man's name seems to have been Gathergold, he might just as suitably have been nicknamed Scattercopper.
At last we began to claw up on a cant, bow-rudder and port-propeller together; only the nicest balancing of tanks saved us from spinning like the rifle-bullet of the old days.
The bird flew down and took the gold chain in his right claw, and then he alighted again in front of the goldsmith and sang:
says she, 'I'll claw his face for'n, let me only catch him
Then suddenly it projected a skinny claw armed with nails nearly an inch long, and laying it on the shoulder of Twala the king, began to speak in a thin and piercing voice--
His breast was in fact, mangled as by the claw of a tiger, and on his side he had a large and badly healed wound.
Was it a fierce tiger of crime, which could only be taken fighting hard with flashing fang and claw, or would it prove to be some skulking jackal, dangerous only to the weak and unguarded?
and my function is to paint--and as a painter I have a conception which is altogether genialisch, of your great-aunt or second grandmother as a subject for a picture; therefore, the universe is straining towards that picture through that particular hook or claw which it puts forth in the shape of me-- not true?