clear


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clear

1. emptied of freight or cargo
2. (of timber) having a smooth, unblemished surface
3. Showjumping (of a round) ridden without any fences being knocked down or any points being lost

clear

[klir]
(computer science)
To restore a storage device, memory device, or binary stage to a prescribed state, usually that denoting zero. Also known as reset.
A function key on calculators, to delete an entire problem or just the last keyboard entry.
(meteorology)
After United States weather observing practice, the state of the sky when it is cloudless or when the sky cover is less than 0.1 (to the nearest tenth).
To change from a stormy or cloudy weather condition to one of no precipitation and decreased cloudiness.
(navigation)
In marine navigation, to leave or pass safely, as to clear port or clear a shoal.
(ordnance)
To give a person a security clearance.
To operate a gun so as to unload it or make certain no ammunition remains; to free a gun of stoppages.

clear

The net distance, free from interruption, between any two surfaces or areas.

clear

i. In air traffic control, it means permitted to take off or land, cleared to carry out other maneuvers, or cleared to proceed under specified conditions. The activity the pilot is cleared to perform is either suffixed to the word clear, as in “clear to take off,” or it is in response to the request by the pilot as when “Permission to take off?” is answered by an air traffic controller's “Clear.”
ii. To rectify stoppage in an automatic weapon. Also to ensure its serviceability as in “clearing guns” (by firing a small burst into the air).
iii. Authorized to carry out any task as in “Clear to alter height” or “Clear to fly radial.”
iv. The area around the aircraft is clear for aircraft starting.
v. In reference to the sky, it is devoid of any clouds as in “clear sky.” The aircraft may also be in between layers but in VMC (visual meteorological conditions). Also means, “A portion of the sky is free or relatively free of clouds.”
vi. To check nearby airspace for safe airwork or maneuvering of aircraft.
vii. To clear an engine. To open the throttle of an idling reciprocating engine in flight to free it from carbon and/or an overrich mixture.
viii. To clear the air, meaning to gain a favorable air situation in a given sector.
ix. To authorize hardware as fit for use.
x. To fly over an obstacle without touching it (i.e., clear of obstacles).

CLEAR

(language)
A specification language based on initial algebras.

["An Informal Introduction to Specification Using CLEAR", R.M. Burstall in The Correctness Problem in Computer Science, R.S. Boyer et al eds, Academic Press 1981, pp. 185-213].

Clearwire

(Clearwire Communications, LLC, Bellevue, WA) A wireless Internet service provider (WISP) that offered mobile and fixed WiMAX service under the CLEAR brand. Clearwire merged its WiMAX network with Sprint Nextel's Xohm-branded WiMAX network in 2008, providing download speeds up to 6 Mbps. In 2013, Sprint acquired Clearwire and notified customers that WiMAX would be ended in late 2015. Users not switching to Sprint's 4G service could continue to use 3G if their devices supported both WiMAX and 3G. Clearwire was spun off from Texas-based Sierra Technologies in 1998 and was acquired by Craig McCaw in 2003. See WiMAX and WISP.

Kleer

Wireless music transmission in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz band. Requiring the Kleer technology in both sending and receiving devices, full 1.411 Mbits/sec CD-quality sound can be sent to headphones and speakers using substantially less power than Bluetooth or Wi-Fi. While Bluetooth and Wi-Fi need at least 20 MHz of bandwidth for music, Kleer uses narrowband 3 MHz channels, which are easier to find in a crowded 2.4 GHz environment. In addition, Kleer can transmit to multiple receivers simultaneously. See aptX.


HearNotes Kleer Stereo
Using Kleer transmission, HearNotes earphones receive separate signals from the transmitter (top), which plugs into any headphone jack. (Images courtesy of HearNotes, www.hearnotes.com)
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, as so often happens, the resulting attacks on the climate-control policy tainted Clear Skies, convincing environmentalists that the administration was not serious about curbing industry emissions.
"Clear Channel, like the Murdoch media empire, is seen by conservatives as a welcome ally," one radio industry figure observed to THE NEW AMERICAN.
In order to get used to the soil on-site, the Minebreaker team got the opportunity to clear the mine belt between the double fence rows around the airport.
Clear Products provides shelf talkers and brochures to help educate shoppers and promote the products in-store.
However, if we desire to strive for the higher levels of ethical behavior, there needs to be a more effective understanding and application of clear and uniform standards of right and wrong.
AFter electro-coating, the vehicle is sprayed with two color base coats, and this is immediately Followed by a powder-slurry clear coat.
THE CLAIM: These are just two of the many products that use a combo of salicylic acid and benzoyl peroxide to clear your skin.
Before clear language: All decisions about the dispensation of subsidies for outside education will be the prerogative of the president's office.
Anne Underwood, product manager for glassware for Corning noted that her firm conducted a consumer market research survey in which "consumers said they preferred clear as a color in beverageware and serveware.
A structure of lines and boxes, with clear, unified authority, would not help solve those problems.
If FAO chose the best data available at the time (the Brazilian estimates of 2 million hectares lost annually in the legal Amazon during the 1980s), that would leave more than 4 million hectares cleared each year outside the Brazilian Amazon.
However, Pearse discovered that the Ministry of Natural Resources lacks clear policy direction.