clear


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clear

1. emptied of freight or cargo
2. (of timber) having a smooth, unblemished surface
3. Showjumping (of a round) ridden without any fences being knocked down or any points being lost

clear

[klir]
(computer science)
To restore a storage device, memory device, or binary stage to a prescribed state, usually that denoting zero. Also known as reset.
A function key on calculators, to delete an entire problem or just the last keyboard entry.
(meteorology)
After United States weather observing practice, the state of the sky when it is cloudless or when the sky cover is less than 0.1 (to the nearest tenth).
To change from a stormy or cloudy weather condition to one of no precipitation and decreased cloudiness.
(navigation)
In marine navigation, to leave or pass safely, as to clear port or clear a shoal.
(ordnance)
To give a person a security clearance.
To operate a gun so as to unload it or make certain no ammunition remains; to free a gun of stoppages.

clear

The net distance, free from interruption, between any two surfaces or areas.

clear

i. In air traffic control, it means permitted to take off or land, cleared to carry out other maneuvers, or cleared to proceed under specified conditions. The activity the pilot is cleared to perform is either suffixed to the word clear, as in “clear to take off,” or it is in response to the request by the pilot as when “Permission to take off?” is answered by an air traffic controller's “Clear.”
ii. To rectify stoppage in an automatic weapon. Also to ensure its serviceability as in “clearing guns” (by firing a small burst into the air).
iii. Authorized to carry out any task as in “Clear to alter height” or “Clear to fly radial.”
iv. The area around the aircraft is clear for aircraft starting.
v. In reference to the sky, it is devoid of any clouds as in “clear sky.” The aircraft may also be in between layers but in VMC (visual meteorological conditions). Also means, “A portion of the sky is free or relatively free of clouds.”
vi. To check nearby airspace for safe airwork or maneuvering of aircraft.
vii. To clear an engine. To open the throttle of an idling reciprocating engine in flight to free it from carbon and/or an overrich mixture.
viii. To clear the air, meaning to gain a favorable air situation in a given sector.
ix. To authorize hardware as fit for use.
x. To fly over an obstacle without touching it (i.e., clear of obstacles).

CLEAR

(language)
A specification language based on initial algebras.

["An Informal Introduction to Specification Using CLEAR", R.M. Burstall in The Correctness Problem in Computer Science, R.S. Boyer et al eds, Academic Press 1981, pp. 185-213].
References in classic literature ?
Meg helped Jo clear away the remains of the feast, which took half the afternoon and left them so tired that they agreed to be contented with tea and toast for supper.
Seated at my own table in clear noonday light I saw a person whom, without my previous experience, I should have taken at the first blush for some housemaid who might have stayed at home to look after the place and who, availing herself of rare relief from observation and of the schoolroom table and my pens, ink, and paper, had applied herself to the considerable effort of a letter to her sweetheart.
Then be called ten times a donkey, and a mule, and an ass, and begone, or I'll clear the world of thee
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
The first of these two clauses, it is clear, only provides a mode for appointing such officers, "whose appointments are NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution, and which SHALL BE ESTABLISHED BY LAW"; of course it cannot extend to the appointments of senators, whose appointments are OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution[2], and who are ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION, and will not require a future establishment by law.
Section II has made clear the relations of the Communists to the existing working-class parties, such as the Chartists in England and the Agrarian Reformers in America.
Days might pass and still such a spoor would be sufficiently plain to lead Korak unfalteringly to its end; while a matter of a few hours only left it as clear to him as though the makers themselves were still in plain sight.
The sky was clear, remote, and empty save for a few horizontal bars far down in the sunset.
Yes, the conscience is clear and the song is clear, and so these little streams flow on, shining in the clear dawn of a golden past to which all poets and philosophers to come will turn with wistful eyes.
But directly she is clear of the narrow seas, heading out into the world with nothing solid to speak of between her and the South Pole, the anchors are got in and the cables disappear from the deck.
She had been sitting perfectly still, looking at the small bit of clear fire in the bright grate.
In the matter of Treason the pig would appear To have aided, but scarcely abetted: While the charge of Insolvency fails, it is clear, If you grant the plea 'never indebted.