minister

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minister,

in diplomacy: see diplomatic servicediplomatic service,
organized body of agents maintained by governments to communicate with one another. Origins

Until the 15th cent. any formal communication or negotiation among nations was conducted either by means of ambassadors specially appointed for a
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; extraterritorialityextraterritoriality
or exterritoriality,
privilege of immunity from local law enforcement enjoyed by certain aliens. Although physically present upon the territory of a foreign nation, those aliens possessing extraterritoriality are considered by customary
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.

minister,

in government: see cabinetcabinet,
group of advisers to the head of the state who themselves are usually the heads of the administrative government departments. The nature of the cabinet differs widely in various countries.
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.

Minister

 

a clergyman in a Protestant church. Unlike Catholic and Eastern Orthodox priests, a minister is not considered the exclusive possessor of “divine grace,” has few or no special vestments, and practices a way of life that is usual for laymen.

minister

1. (esp in Presbyterian and some Nonconformist Churches) a member of the clergy
2. a person appointed to head a government department
3. any diplomatic agent accredited to a foreign government or head of state
References in periodicals archive ?
Although two of the clergywomen were raised in south Trinidad, no clergywoman is based in any of the more rural southern parishes and only one woman has ever been sent to train in the urban centre of the south.
This same clergywoman has visited South Africa (three times now) at the invitation of the Catholic Church in Africa.
Apart from music, the clergywoman is also a physical fitness buff.
As a clergywoman, I keenly feel how my ordination as a Protestant is a stumbling block for the unity of our churches, even as I am equally committed to following God's call in my life.
He ended his tour at Westminster Abbey where he publicly shook hands with a clergywoman, the Rev Dr Jane Hedges, for the first time.
Another problem in estimating the number of parish nurses, the United Church of Christ clergywoman said, is that "parish nursing is so broadly defined.
Sometimes people think it is compulsory to have a funeral taken by a clergyman or clergywoman which isn't the case.
Publicly, I was enjoying ministry in a local church as well as national and international preaching engagements, which both challenged and supported my personal spirituality and my development as an ordained clergywoman.
A clergywoman has become the latest victim of a brooding tawny owl that has attacked five people in the south Shropshire town of Clun while protecting its young.
For a black clergywoman with children -- from my own womb and those who are mine because I am their pastor -- the situation became a faith call.
I once heard a Protestant clergywoman say to an ecumenical assembly, "We all know there was no Virgin Birth.