clerihew


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clerihew

a form of comic or satiric verse, consisting of two couplets of metrically irregular lines, containing the name of a well-known person
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Paul Ingram; THE LOST CLERIHEWS OF PAUL INGRAM; Ice Cube Press (Nonfiction: Poetry) 19.
The light verse quatrain known as the clerihew was introduced in Biography for Beginners, by "E.
Casey at the Bat (3 rd Edition) Annotated Night Before Christmas Poetic Parodies (many examples) "Wandering Jew" (a clerihew in a book review) "Word Ways: The Journal of Recreational Linguistics (vol.
The Board were victorious courtesy of Dan Johnson, Tony Lynch and Richard Clerihew.
The other is a cartoon from about 1950 by Nicholas Clerihew Bentley, and includes Peeping Tom leaning out of a window.
This type of comic biographical verse form was invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley, who introduced it in Biography for Beginners (1905) and continued in More Biography (1929) and Baseless Biography (1939).
The A team secured the scalp with points from Brett Hanratty, Richard Clerihew and Dan Johnson.
Lindon's palindrome is so well structured that it almost becomes a poetic form of its own, like a haiku or a clerihew.
Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956) wrote the classic detective story Trent's Last Case but he is also known for the verse form that was named after him - the clerihew.
However, Harry Morris, Tony Lynch, Brett Hanratty, Richard Clerihew and Dan Johnson sealed victory for The Board.
The clerihew is a funny form, and Paul is a funny man, and theirs is a marriage made in funny heaven.