clerk


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Related to clerk: bank clerk, law clerk

clerk

1. clerk to the justices (in England) a legally qualified person who sits in court with lay justices to advise them on points of law
2. an employee of a court, legislature, board, corporation, etc., who keeps records and accounts, etc.
3. Brit a senior official of the House of Commons
4. a cleric
5. US and Canadian short for salesclerk
6. Archaic a scholar
References in periodicals archive ?
Office of the Clerk Legislative Building Room 237 Winnipeg, MB R3C 0V8 204 945-3636 (tel) 204 948-2507 (fax) patricia.
Civil Judge Kaleemullah along with circle officer Mehar Mumtaz raided and caught the head clerk red handed while taking bribe.
Hartley County Clerk Melissa Mead said her office won't issue same-sex marriage licenses until the clock runs out on the 25 days that parties in the Supreme Court case have to ask for a rehearing of the case.
Hammond said that for years, the town clerk's assistant has taken over when the clerk retires, then remains clerk until retirement, when another assistant clerk takes over, and so on, and "it becomes a processing job.
As per details, 500 clerks of schools will be transferred under this policy.
Prior to her appointment as clerk to Katherine the only Royal Town Council in Wales and one of just four in the UK she was business development manager for North Wales for Barclays Bank.
In reaching this conclusion, the court explored the constitutional and statutory grants of power to the clerk as county auditor.
My father George Guy is pictured in 1925 when he took his first job as a junior clerk, aged 14, with cotton brokers Ferguson & Hall.
A town clerk might also serve as a finance director, regardless of his or her education and experience, Whitbey said.
The clerk resorted to the handgun after neither of the other options stopped the robber.
From allegations that the Justices' law clerk hiring practices are riddled with gender and racial bias (1) to debates over the level of influence wielded by clerks, (2) legal scholars and journalists have remained intrigued with these "junior justices.
In the 1970s, Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong rattled the cloistered Court with their best-selling Brethren, (4) and twenty years later former Blackmun clerk Edward Lazarus broke the clerks' code of silence and published a tell-all insider's account in Closed Chambers.