client

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client

1. a customer
2. a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
3. Computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Client

The person or organization who has a need for a project; responsible for the overall financing of the work and directly or indirectly employs the entire design and building team.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

client

[′klī·ənt]
(computer science)
A hardware or software entity that requests shared services from a server.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

client

(programming)
A computer system or process that requests a service of another computer system or process (a "server") using some kind of protocol and accepts the server's responses. A client is part of a client-server software architecture.

For example, a workstation requesting the contents of a file from a file server is a client of the file server.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

client

(1) A desktop computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet, as well as any other electronic device that sends or receives data from a server. The term implies a connection to a wired or wireless network. Contrast with server. See client application, client download, client/server, thin client and fat client.

(2) One end of the spectrum in a request/supply relationship between programs. See X Window and OLE.

(3) The customer of a vendor or consultant. The client of an IT department is the end user.




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