attachment

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Related to clinical attachment level: Clinical Attachment Loss

attachment

1. 
a. the arrest of a person for disobedience to a court order
b. the lawful seizure of property and placing of it under control of a court
c. a writ authorizing such arrest or seizure
2. Law the binding of a debt in the hands of a garnishee until its disposition has been decided by the court

attachment

  1. the emotional bond between infant and mother.
  2. the types of behaviour displayed by the infant to indicate an attachment, e.g. following parents, crying, smiling.
  3. the more abstract psychological tie felt towards a nurturing figure involving a mutual dependency for emotional satisfaction.
A theory of attachment was first proposed by BOWLBY (1958,1969) who was primarily concerned with the first two interpretations, citing ethological evidence to support his claims about how human infants use certain types of behaviour to elicit psychological as well as physical care from their mothers. Attachment merely refers to whether the child has formed a tie to a caregiver, but more recently the notion of security of attachment (Ainsworth et al., Strange Situation Behaviour of One-year Olds, 1978) was established to assess the quality of the attachment relationship once it has been formed.

attachment

[ə′tach·mənt]
(computer science)
An additional file sent with an e-mail message.
(organic chemistry)
The conversion of a molecular entity into another molecular structure solely by formation of a single two-center bond with another molecular entity and no other changes in bonding.
(psychology)
The behavior of an individual who relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another individual or object.
(virology)
The initial stage in the infection of a cell by a virus that follows a chance collision by the virus with a suitable receptor area on the cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical attachment levels (mm) were calculated for each individual and then averaged across participants in each group.
It is important to note, however, that several studies have found a positive association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes when clinical attachment level or bone levels were the main parameters used for diagnosis.
Probing depth, Recession depth and clinical attachment level were recorded on the 24th week.
Plaque index (PI), Calculus index (CI), Gingival index (GI), Clinical attachment level (CAL), Papillary bleeding index (PBI) of each subject was performed by a single investigator.
Probing Depth (PD) and Clinical attachment level were noted to be in direct proportional relation to the levels of pain perception by the patients.
All the periodontal parameters including plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical attachment level and number of gingival recessions were compared with the mean width of keratinized gingiva and thickness of attached gingiva using Karl Pearson correlation coefficient within the groups.
In the present study, the mean clinical attachment level gain was 2.
5) Avradopoulos studied 6 patients and found no significant differences between SRP with and without adjunctive use of the Perioscope[TM] on clinical measures of plaque index, gingival index, bleeding upon probing (BOP) and clinical attachment levels when baseline measurements were compared to evaluation at one and three months post-treatment.
1-3) Typically evaluated parameters include probing depth, gingival levels, presence or absence of bleeding, and clinical attachment levels.
Plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded.
As a basic premise, it should be understood that the 'gold standard' for successful treatment is defined as maintenance of or a gain in the clinical attachment level, and initial therapy has a similar widely accepted benchmark in that treatment must include debridement of the accretions on the root surface by means of scaling.
At the end of the six month study, patients in the Periostat + Atridox + SRP group showed a 48% mean improvement in clinical attachment level and a 44% mean reduction in periodontal pocket depths for pockets of 7 mm or greater at baseline, compared to comparable pockets in the patients who had SRP alone.

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