major depression

(redirected from clinical depression)
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Related to clinical depression: bipolar disorder, manic depression

major depression

[′mā·jər di′presh·ən]
(psychology)
A type of affective disorder characterized by major episodes of depression without intervening manic episodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
She told Yours magazine: "Overcoming clinical depression is the hardest thing I've ever had to do.
It's not considered a treatment for temporary low mood, however; rather clinical depression diagnosed by a GP or psychiatrist, and mainly for people who've had at least two courses of antidepressants (NICE recommends patients are offered treatment such as CBT and/or antidepressants first).
Tracking the teenagers for three years, the team found that those in Group 4 were on average seven times more likely than those in Group 1, and two to three times more likely than in the other two groups, to develop clinical depression.
I would never try to give medical advice as I am no doctor, but I am an expert at living with severe clinical depression and if sharing my own stories helps then I see that as my role in life.
The National MS Society reports that Depression in its various forms is common during the course of multiple sclerosis, and clinical Depression is more frequent among people with MS than it is in the general population or in persons with other chronic, disabling conditions.
He told Gulf News that mental illnesses, especially clinical depression cases, were on the rise.
I was fortunate when I came out of Shelton Hospital that I was accepted back into the community and I even ran a youth club at Ruyton XI for two years, quite an ordeal after clinical depression.
Let's not confuse clinical depression with the inability of some ministers to honour their calling to word and sacrament by trying to meet all the expectations of those among whom they serve.
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) appear to have a significantly higher risk of clinical depression than healthy individuals and patients with another common chronic condition, diabetes, acording to a study reported in the January issue of Chest.
Brampton, a noted journalist, magazine editor (Elle) and novelist, has suffered from clinical depression for most of her life.
Only 49 patients (5%) who were taking antidepressant medication for clinical depression at the time of the surgery met the study's definition of having depression.
A "down" time is one thing, real clinical depression is a chemical brain imbalance which needs tobe treated as surely as diabetes necessitates medical care.

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