bleeding

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bleeding

[′blēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The undesirable movement of certain components of a plastic material to the surface of a finished article. Also known as migration.
(engineering)
Natural separation of a liquid from a liquid-solid or semisolid mixture; for example, separation of oil from a stored lubricating grease, or water from freshly poured concrete. Also known as bleedout.
(materials)
The outward penetration of a coloring agent from a substrate through the surface coat of paint.
The movement of grout through a pavement from below a road surfacing material to the outer surface.
(textiles)
Referring to a fabric in which the dye is not fast and therefore comes out when the fabric is wet.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bleeding

1. The upward penetration of a coloring pigment from a substrate through a topcoat of paint.
2. The oozing of grout from below a road-surfacing material to the surface in hot weather.
3. Exudation of one or more components of a sealant, with possible absorption by adjacent porous surfaces.
4. The autogenous flow of mixing water within, or its emergence from, newly placed concrete or mortar; caused by the settlement of the solid materials within the mass or by drainage of mixing water; also called water gain.
5. The diffusion of coloring matter through a coating from the substrate, or the discoloration that arises from such a process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This review was undertaken in order to investigate current evidence behind their potential to prevent clinically significant bleeding in SRMD.
In patients exhibiting clinically significant bleeding, thromboelastometry can aid in determining whether the bleeding is based on a coagulopathy or is due to surgical reasons.
Effient plus ASA, however, produced higher rates of clinically significant bleeding than clopidogrel plus ASA (see Bleeding).
Historically, critically ill patients with endoscopically proven lesions have developed clinically significant bleeding in up to 25% of the cases.
Eltrombopag (Promacta) reduced the odds of bleeding by 76% and of clinically significant bleeding by 65%, vs.

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