Clinker

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clinker

the ash and partially fused residues from a coal-fired furnace or fire

Clinker

 

the solid, sintered residue obtained after subjecting certain by-products of metallurgical production (for example, cakes, zinc-retort residues, or slags) and other zinc-containing products to the Waelz process.

The composition of the clinker depends on the composition of the original raw material. For example, clinker obtained by subjecting zinc cakes to the Waelz process contains 2.5–3 percent zinc, 1–3 percent lead, 1–3 percent copper, 10 g per ton gold, about 50 g per ton silver, 35–40 percent iron, and 20–30 percent carbon; the balance contains SiO2, CaO, and several other oxides. Clinker is an intermediate product of zinc manufacture. In copper or lead manufacture, copper, lead, and other valuable component elements are extracted by subsequent pyrometallurgical treatments. To separate copper concentrated in the magnetic clinker fraction, it is sometimes advisable to pulverize the clinker and to follow this step with magnetic separation.


Clinker

 

clay articles, usually brick-shaped, that are fired until they are completely sintered.

Clinker, made of highly plastic clays, is grouped with the stone-ceramic materials. It is used in paving highways, in facing hydraulic engineering structures, socles, and the facades of buildings, and in lining reservoirs in chemical manufacturing. The technology of clinkering is analogous to that of brick manufacture. A semifinished product of cement production that consists of a sintered mixture of limestone and clay (or slag) is also called clinker.

clinker

[′kliŋ·kər]
(geology)
Burnt or vitrified stony material, as ejected by a volcano or formed in a furnace.
(materials)
An overburned brick.

clinker

1. A partially fused product of a kiln, which is ground for use in cement; also called cement clinker.
2. A vitrified or partially vitrified residue of coal which has been burnt in a furnace; used as an aggregate in cinder block.
References in periodicals archive ?
This calculation was widely adopted for production of clinker and development of clinker for special applications and is in use today, almost three-quarters of a century later, as part of the ASTM C 150 specification for hydraulic cements.
The optical microscope is a primary tool for the cement chemist for the study of clinker (Fig.
Harold Insley helped to develop the application of reflected light to a microscopic study of polished, etched clinker (23).
Insley (36) compiled phase diagrams for silicate scientists that served to aid knowledge of high-temperature phase equilibria and understanding of the nature of clinker compositions.
Calculation of the raw material mixture for the production of sulfoferrite clinker produced by glandular and sulfate modules and characterizing the resulting SFC mineralogical composition, namely basicity sulfoferrite calcium and its percentage with respect to belite [2, 11].
Maximum firing temperature sulfoferrite clinker based on man-made materials became the temperature to 1350[degrees]C.
The phase structure of the obtained spec clinker was investigated by X-ray analysis on the instrument ARL X'TRA.
At temperatures between 1300 and 1350[degrees]C, it is clear that a blending ratio of 10 to 15% could be used in making clinker materials.
Up to 15% of oil shale ash can be used with a typical Portland cement clinker without affecting the main properties of the cement.
The determination of mineral phases and chemical composition of natural clinker is vital in resolving problems concerning their genesis, correlation of coal beds, characterization of the protolith and assessment of potential environmental impacts of coal combustion.
The bulk chemical composition similarity of natural clinker with the volcanic materials from which the natural zeolites are originated by post-magmatic hydrothermal activity has motivated attempts of making zeolite from this geomaterial by Rios and co-workers (Rios & Williams, 2008; Rios et al.
Although its potential application might consume only a small part of the natural clinker produced by coal combustion, end products could reach a much higher added value than that currently presenting this geomaterial in the coal industry of Colombia.