clique

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Related to cliquey: cliquish

clique

[klēk]
(mathematics)
In a graph, a complete subgraph of that graph.

Clique

 

a group of people striving to achieve by any available means base, selfish aims (for example, a court clique or fascist clique).

clique

(mathematics)
A maximal totally connected subgraph. Given a graph with nodes N, a clique C is a subset of N where every node in C is directly connected to every other node in C (i.e. C is totally connected), and C contains all such nodes (C is maximal). In other words, a clique contains all, and only, those nodes which are directly connected to all other nodes in the clique.

References in periodicals archive ?
They were always a little separate from us.) Gloria, a student who had been very positive in describing others, explained that she felt ridiculed by some of the cliquey, university students.
"It is a very cliquey school and there was a lot of pressure," she explained.
I did make a few friends at the school gates, but they're all quite cliquey.
There have been isolated cases of name-dropping where it has benefited me, but the music scene in the North East can be quite cliquey to break into at times, so I'm extremely grateful to such people like Richard Southern from The Surf Cafe for inviting me to play there: that was just from an Instagram video I posted, so I felt very fortunate to be invited along."
The rag trade is cliquey and complex, and the process of designing, testing, manufacturing and marketing garments takes enormous time and patience.
Instead the first thing they did was gather into little like-minded cliquey fragments and work out how best to save themselves.
"It is going to be a very different sort of place, without being pretentious or cliquey," the 78 spokesman added.
"I'll be hosting it, but it won't be advertised, we'll put it on by word of mouth, but I don't want it to be cliquey where you see the same faces every week," he added.
"The House of Commons is more class-bound than the House of Lords, the Labour party more rigidly stratified than the Conservatives and comprehensive schools more cliquey than Eton College" - Toby Young, author of How to Lose Friends and Alienate People.
What sort of message do the trainers think their position is sending out to a public that is already generally quite suspicious about the cliquey racing world?