cloaca


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cloaca

(klōā`kə), in biology, enlarged posterior end of the digestive tract of some animals. The cloaca, from the Latin word for sewer, is a single chamber into which pass solid and liquid waste materials as well as the products of the reproductive organs, the gametes. Cloacas are found in amphibians, reptiles, birds, and lower mammals; higher mammals have a separate rectal outlet, the anus. The term cloaca is also used for analogous chambers in many invertebrates, such as worms of the phylum NematodaNematoda
, phylum consisting of about 12,000 known species, and many more predicted species, of worms (commonly known as roundworms or threadworms). Nematodes live in the soil and other terrestrial habitats as well as in freshwater and marine environments; some live on the deep
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.

Cloaca

 

the broadened extremity of the hindgut of some vertebrate animals. The wall of the cloaca is covered with a many-layered epithelium. The ureter, the genital ducts (sperm ducts or oviducts), and the urinary bladder open into the cloaca. It is found in certain cyclostomes (hagfish) and fishes (sharks, skates, dipnoans and pipefish) and in all amphibians, reptiles, and birds. The cloaca is found in mammals of the subclass Prototheria. In other mammals a cloaca is found only in the early embryonic stage of development; it subsequently divides into the urogenital sinus and the terminal part of the rectum, which have separate urogenital and anal openings. In amphibians the urinary bladder is formed from an evagination of the abdominal wall of the cloaca. Allantoides appear in the embryo of amniotes.

cloaca

[klō′ā·kə]
(invertebrate zoology)
The chamber which functions as a respiratory, excretory, and reproductive duct in certain invertebrates.
(vertebrate zoology)
The chamber which receives the discharges of the intestine, urinary tract, and reproductive canals in monotremes, amphibians, birds, reptiles, and many fish.

cloaca

An underground conduit for drainage; a sewer, esp. in ancient Rome.

cloaca

a cavity in the pelvic region of most vertebrates, except higher mammals, and certain invertebrates, into which the alimentary canal and the genital and urinary ducts open
References in periodicals archive ?
A portion of the enlarged, contrast-filled cloaca could be seen herniated through, and partially strangulated by, the defect in the ventral body wall (Fig 2).
How did the ever-increasing capacities of computers and robots influence the Cloaca series as it developed from 2000 onwards?
Detailed anatomical descriptions exist on the cloaca for all families of salamanders (Sever, 1991a).
Foram visibilizadas quatro estruturas ovais hiperecogenicas, de contornos irregulares formadoras de artefatos de imagem (sombreamento acustico posterior e sombreamento de borda), localizadas proximas a cloaca. As imagens ultrassonograficas foram sugestivas de presenca de ovos atresicos.
The copulatory organ is a mass of richly vascularized tissue, with intense pigmentation from the base to the extremity of the penis, which is eversible through the cloaca by the action of erector muscles and blood inflow.
Sex of these doves was determined via pelvic spread and then confirmed via direct examination of gonads or cloaca. All doves were collected in Kleberg, Cameron, or Hidalgo counties, Texas.
(3) The primitive hindgut is the anlage of the terminal ileum, colon and cloaca. The cloaca is divided into anterior and posterior positions which form the lower genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal systems, respectively.
His production of Maria Goos' "Cloaca," created at Berlin's Renaissance Theater, opened in Klagenfurt the day before his death.
Os orgaos foram coletados e tomados dados como comprimento do oviduto e suas porcoes: infundibulo, magno, istmo, utero e vagina, alem da cloaca. Os fragmentos foram fixados em formol 10% e glutaraldeido 2,5% para microscopia de luz e varredura, respectivamente, sendo processados e corados em HE, Tricomo de Masson e PAS.
The history of London divides itself between East and West around this route, following the now subterranean River Fleet, a murky cloaca beneath the clogged artery of Farringdon Road.