clot

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clot

[klät]
(physiology)
A semisolid coagulum of blood or lymph.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leg immobilization, due to a cast or brace or paralysis, allows blood in leg veins to stagnate, significantly increasing clotting risk.
Medications that thin the blood, also called anticoagulants, help lower the risk of clotting.
University of Illinois biochemistry professor James Morrissey, who led the study with chemistry professor Chad Rienstra and biochemistry, biophysics and pharmacology professor Emad Tajkhorshid report that they are the first to describe in atomic detail a chemical interaction that is vital to blood clotting.
In select patients with extensive clotting, treatment may involve having a clot-busting drug, such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA), injected directly into the clots.
In 2001, Medicare's outpatient expenditures for blood clotting factor used to treat the estimated 1,100 beneficiaries with hemophilia totaled about $105 million, or more than 2 percent of total Medicare spending on outpatient drugs.
Quik Clot rapidly absorbs all the liquid in a bloody wound, which allows the blood's clotting factors to work immediately to stop the bleeding.
Blood levels of several proteins associated with inflammation of the blood vessels and blood clotting were measured the morning before the marathon, within four hours after, and the morning after.
A note of caution: "Since garlic might interfere with clotting, people taking blood-thinning medications like Coumadin should let their physicians know if they're also taking garlic supplements or eating fresh garlic every day," says Gary Abrams of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
The National Blood Clot Alliance (NBCA) is a patient-led organization combining the unique perspectives of healthcare providers, individuals afflicted with clotting disorders and community leaders.
The pills might also replace another anticoagulant, warfarin, which many people now take orally for months or years to counter clotting risks associated with cancer, certain heart conditions, or a history of blood clots, says Giancarlo Agnelli of the University of Perugia in Italy.
He is taking a blood thinner to reduce the chance of future clotting and is expected to remain hospitalized for seven to 10 days.
Eat low fat--A fatty meal can increase your risk of clotting.