cloud cover


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

cloud cover

[′klau̇d ‚kəv·ər]
(meteorology)
That portion of the sky cover which is attributed to clouds, usually measured in tenths of sky covered. Also known as cloudage; cloudiness.

cloud cover

Estimated as the apparent coverage of the total sky as seen by an observer. It is expressed as octas or decas. When half the sky is covered with clouds, it is referred to as four-octa or five-deca clouds. Generally, the cloud amount is indicated by the expressions few, scattered, and overcast. Also called cloud amount
References in periodicals archive ?
We found that more birds were killed following nights with [greater than or equal to] 50% cloud cover and northerly winds, with our two largest kills occurring under these conditions at WILL.
The following night, Dec 15/16, Gordon MacLeod observing from Bower, by Wick in the far north of Scotland, managed to glimpse three Geminids and a bright sporadic between 21:00UT and 22:00 UT in fair conditions with some cloud cover.
Early estimates of cloud cover were based on surface observations of cloud distribution; this is subjective and lacks spatial information on cloud extent (Spinhirne et al.
Royal Commission on Environmental Protection found that the net effects of ozone, contrail, and aviation-induced cloud cover is likely to triple the warming effect of aircraft-emitted C[O.
Svensmark's results, which have been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, remain controversial but may revolutionize climate science--a field that has lacked a thorough understanding of the effects of cloud cover.
An improved laser ceilometer-which can measure up to four layers of cloud cover from zero to 30,000 feet-has been unveiled by All Weather Inc.
Such forecasts not only account for atmospheric ozone, which filters UV radiation, but also a region's altitude and cloud cover.
Computer algorithms convert these signatures into measures of forest cover, soil moisture, cloud cover, ocean chlorophyll content, and many other useful parameters.
This is most evident in Den Hartog's manipulation of color and opacity: Where the water is stormy, its surface seems to take on the reflected gray of cloud cover, and where the artist suggests turbulent shallows, her materials become appropriately frothy.
Real-time weather information including wind speed, cloud cover and stages of the moon for night missions is available at their fingertips.
Low and slow-moving cloud cover prevented them from seeing anything there.
The wide variability was due to time of day, cloud cover and surface water movements when the measurements were taken.