Cloudberry

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cloudberry

 

(Rubus chamaemorus), a plant of the family Rosaceae; it is of the same genus as the raspberry, blackberry, and stone bramble. An herbaceous perennial, it is 5–20 cm tall and has a long, creeping rhizome and erect annual stems. The leaves are reniform, wrinkled, five-lobed, and dark green. The flowers are unisexual (the staminate and pistillate flowers are on different plants), solitary, white, and large. The fruit is a multiple drupe consisting of red and, later, orange drupelets with a pleasant aroma. The cloudberry grows mainly in tundra and taiga zones of the northern hemisphere on mossy marshes and swampy forests. It grows in the northern European USSR and forms large thickets in Siberia and the Soviet Far East. The fruits contain sugar (3–6 percent), citric and malic acids, tannins, and pectins; they are used fresh in food and in the preparation of jams and beverages. The cloudberry produces a significant quantity of nectar.

T. V. EGOROVA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study investigated the yields, chemical compositions, and recovery rates of antioxidant compounds of seed oils extracted from cloudberries, bilberries, and black currants by solvent extraction and by SFE at 350 bar and at 50[degrees]C and 80[degrees]C.
Since it's unlikely that I'll find cloudberries to make jam with in Cairo, I decided to make hasselback potatoes, the baked potato of Sweden, crispy on the outside and fork-tender in the center, served aside a veal roast, as I think back to the short-term friend I had, who moved away before sealing friendships for life, who taught us about the grown-up world of food and men.
Cloudberries are largely harvested in the open alpine areas of the Richardson Mountains.
Themes and issues related to harvesting practices and the ecological factors affecting the abundance and distribution of cranberries, cloudberries, and blueberries were identified; these themes became the basis for a series of semidirected interviews with 45 informants, identified as berry harvesters, including women and men from ages 16-85.
The mapping provided insight into the spatial distribution of berry patches relative to other landscape features and culturally significant sites such as cabins and historical sites including the best locations for picking cranberries, blueberries, and cloudberries.
In the case of cloudberries, few access rules appear to be in use; this may be due to the fact that many of the good cloudberry picking areas are located along the Dempster highway, an area considered to be public or "open to anyone".
Blueberry patches appear more predictable than cloudberries. However, given the susceptibility of patches to the succession of willow and other invasive species, they are considered to be somewhat unpredictable over time (Table III).
For example, there are better defined property rights associated with cranberries, which are abundant and predictable, than cloudberries, which are more scattered in distribution and sensitive to precipitation and temperature extremes.
So it [the blueberries] was only in certain places--shaded where I found cloudberries and blueberries but that's what happened (May Andre, April 7, 2003).
The contribution of the current study to general common property theory may be limited in that berries such as cloudberries, blueberries, and cranberries are not susceptible to the same potential for over-harvesting and lack of regeneration as is the case with fisheries or forests.
Cloudberries and elderberries are available in specialty markets.
Mewn siop yno prynodd jar o Molto Syltetoy - cloudberries, ac mae eu llun ar y jar, ffrwyth lliw oren.