coal cutter

coal cutter

[′kōl ‚kəd·ər]
(mining engineering)
A power-operated machine which cuts out a thin strip of coal from the bottom of the seam; it draws itself by rope haulage along the coal face.
References in periodicals archive ?
Peng, "The nonlinear dynamics response of cracked gear system in a coal cutter taking environmental multi-frequency excitation forces", Nonlinear Dynamics, vol.
Jackie Milburn, son of an Ashington coal cutter, himself worked at the local colliery and sometimes put in a double shift on a Friday so that he could play football on the Saturday.
Our main work down the pits was described as "canch" work, this was when our deputy would blast a certain amount of stone and when the cordite and smoke disappeared we would go in and clear it away so that the coal cutter machine could get at the seam of coal.
THE explosion that left 29 miners missing in New Zealand was a series of bangs that pelted debris and made it a struggle to breathe, said a coal cutter who lost consciousness but eventually walked out of the tunnel with minor injuries.
THE explosion that left 29 miners missing in New Zealand was a series of bangs that pelted debris and made it a struggle to breathe, according to a coal cutter who lost consciousness but eventually walked out of the tunnel with minor injuries.
Daniel Rockhouse, 24, was knocked unconscious by the explosion but he came round before dragging dazed coal cutter Russell Smith through thick smoke to safety.
On the night of the explosion, 14-year-old Albert Rowlands cycled with his father, a coal cutter, to join the evening shift.
He got a job at Binley Colliery as a coal cutter. We lived in Willenhall for a short time then came to Binley village, where I've been ever since.
term "hewer" for the miner taking coal from the coalface had been replaced by "coal cutter" [BI: MG1419/81-52-1272/Al0].
Godfrey Owen Phillips' 'Coal Cutter's Dream' is a wood carving made from a four-metre wide section of Caerphilly's famous cedar tree which had to be felled.
Former coal cutter Mr Geoff Kenyon, aged 63, who now lives in Telford, said: "It was a very hard job and very dangerous.