coalescence process

coalescence process

[‚kō·ə′les·əns ‚präs·əs]
(meteorology)
The growth of raindrops by the collision and coalescence of cloud drops or small precipitation particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Lucas, D., "A Literature Review on Mechanisms and Models for the Coalescence Process of Fluid Particles," Chemical Engineering Science 65(10):2851-2864, 2010.
Physically speaking, the coalescence process consists of three regimes, called the viscous, visco-inertia, and inertial coalescence regimes [1].
With the continuous improvement of test devices and methods, high-precision instruments have been employed to capture the crack coalescence process. For example, high-speed video cameras were used to study the failure process of precracked specimens and obtained the footage on the whole process from crack initiation and crack propagation to final failure [6, 7, 9-13].
Other strategies have been developed to examine the effect of emulsification process, oil and salt on the particle size distribution, creaming/sedimentation and coalescence process with respect to coalescence time [16, 17].
The light nuclei production in general might be a more complicated coalescence process, for example, coalescence of nucleons in the local rest frame of the fluid cell.
The number density N of bubbles retained upon termination of their coalescence process can be estimated using the following formula [23]:
Above this layer there might be warm air without ice, but you must refer to atmospheric data or a weather briefer to be certain--the droplets might have formed only in a collision and coalescence process and there might not be a warm layer of safety.
The Si nuclei with the intermediate state of merging were pointed out by arrows in Figure 3(c), which means that the coalescence process of the nuclei was progressively undergoing with the growth of the nuclei.
Interstices resulting from the particle coalescence process arc visible.