coalesce

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coalesce

[‚kō·ə′les]
(science and technology)
To come together to form a whole.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The two LIGO gravitational wave detectors in Hanford Washington and Livingston Louisiana have caught a second robust signal from two black holes in their final orbits and then their coalescence into a single black hole," a (https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/news/ligo20160615) statement on LIGO's website said.
The process consists of four steps: (1) dissolution of physical foaming agent into polymer matrix at high pressure, (2) temperature increase or pressure release to induce phase instability and bubble nucleation, (3) bubble growth, and (4) bubble coalescence and stabilization.
They concluded that the chain branching could suppress cell coalescence owing to the enhanced melt strength.
None of the results observed the dynamics of bubble coalescence. Therefore, the previous papers could not completely clarify the role of bubble coalescence in opening the cell structure and the effect of viscoelastic properties on bubble coalescence and formation of open cell structure.
With new cracks generated or the extrusion on the sawtooth interface after MC coalescence, the shear stress rose up again after experiencing a short shear stress valley.
In the numerical simulation, crack initiation and coalescence can easily be recorded.
To clearly state the shear failure process, according to the fracturing features at different stages, four typical fracturing moments, that is, visual crack initiation (Point A), one MC coalescence (Point B), complete crack coalescence (Point C), and the residual stage (Point D), are presented to stand for the whole fracturing process.
'Coalescence' is said to do this by discovering that the individual has multiple identities; by recognizing 'not the "one-and-the-sameness" that the word identity denotes, but self-understanding across time, under changing circumstances'.