coast

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coast,

land bordering an ocean or other large body of water. The line of contact between the land and water surfaces is called the shoreline. It fluctuates with the waves and tides. Sometimes the terms coast and shore are used synonymously, but often shore is interpreted to mean only the zone between the shorelines at high tide and low tide, and coast indicates a strip of land of indefinite width landward of the shore. Classically, coasts have been designated as submergent if they resulted from a rise in the relative sea level and emergent if they resulted from a decline. Young submergent coasts usually are irregular and have deep water offshore and many good harbors, either bays or estuaries. Much of the coast of New England and most of the Atlantic coast of Europe are young submergent coasts according to this classification scheme. Gradually the submergent coast, subjected to erosive attacks of the ocean and other agents, becomes mature. Headlands are worn back to form cliffs, at the base of which deposits of eroded material accumulate as fringing beaches; spits and bars also grow up from material that is carried by currents and deposited in deeper water. The shoreline is called mature when it is smooth, the headlands having been cut away and the bays either filled up or closed off by spits. Emergent shorelines usually have shallow water for some distance offshore. Such shorelines are found along the Atlantic coast of the SE United States and along part of the coast of Argentina, near the Río de la Plata. This classification system does not adequately describe many coasts, partly because many of them exhibit features of both submergence and emergence. Because of these and other problems a classification system that is based on the most recent and predominant geologic agent forming the coast has become popular. Under this scheme, there are essentially two major types of coasts. Primary coasts are youthful coasts formed where the sea rests against a land mass whose topography was formed by terrestrial agents. These coasts include land erosion coasts (Maine), volcanic coasts (Hawaii), deposition coasts (Nile Delta coast), and fault coasts (Red Sea). Secondary coasts are formed chiefly and most recently by marine agents, and may even be primary coasts that have been severely modified by wave action. These coasts include wave erosion coasts, marine deposition coasts, and coasts built by organisms (reefs and mangrove coasts). The nature of the coastline of a country or a state is an important factor in its economic development because it relates to defense, fishing, recreation, and overseas commerce.

Bibliography

See C. A. M. King, Beaches and Coasts (2d ed. 1972).

COAST

(kohst) An optical interferometer at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory.

coast

[kōst]
(engineering)
A memory feature on a radar which, when activated, causes the range and angle systems to continue to move in the same direction and at the same speed as that required to track an original target.
(geography)
The general region of indefinite width that extends from the sea inland to the first major change in terrain features.

coast

1. 
a. the line or zone where the land meets the sea or some other large expanse of water
b. (in combination): coastland
2. US
a. a slope down which a sledge may slide
b. the act or an instance of sliding down a slope

COAST

References in periodicals archive ?
We established coastal cameras in the coastal barangays.
Mukhtiar Ahmed Mahar handed over the Vice Chancellor booklets comprising research studies on review of Sindh Coastal Development Authority Act 1994 and Sindh Coastal Development Plan, razor clam fishery and socio-economic conditions of fishing community in coastal areas of Sindh Pakistan for accreditation of M.Sc certification, education and research on coastal fisheries management in Sindh Pakistan.
Were protecting our marine and coastal environments for the communities that rely on them every day and the millions of people who visit them every year.
The Coastal Companies is a supplier of produce and dairy in the Mid-Atlantic and a leading regional processor of fruits and vegetables.
In contrary, a number of research studies have also been conducted which highlights issues related to tourism, in particular context of developing countries (for example, Scheyvens and Momsen, 2008; Cater, 1993; Dodds and Butler, 2010; Romati, 2007; Ryan, 2001; Scheyvens, and Momsen, 2008; Mathieson and Wall, 1982; Edwards, 1988; Pearce, 1989; Clark, 1996 and Orams, 1999).The coastal area has been regarded is a zone of extreme activities and an exchange zone both within and between social, cultural, physical, biological and economic progression.
In his concluding remarks, PN Commander Coast Rear Admiral Moazzam Ilyas, the chief guest, said that the situation along country's coast required attention of the government as well as of private institutions to re-analyse the present mode of coastal management.
Guangshen Coastal Expressway (Provincial Line S3) is an important channel connecting Guangzhou and Shenzhen, and Guangdong and Hong Kong.
The Coastal Security exercise is being conducted and coordinated by Indian Coast Guard, District Headquarter at Goa.
She said funding will be channeled through non-governmental organizations or people's organizations for ongoing initiatives of coastal communities.
Analysis by the Social Market Foundation (SMF) think tank found that 85% of Great Britain's 98 coastal local authorities had pay levels below the national average for 2016, when employees in seaside communities were paid about PS3,600 less.
There's good news for saltwater fishermen with the launch of the Coastal Salt Box - a monthly subscription box filled with high quality gear focusing on various types of saltwater fishing.
Collaborative compiled and co-edited by Darius Bartlett (Department of Geography, University College Cork, Ireland) and Louis Celliers (Coastal Systems Research Group, Natural Resources and the Environment Business Unit), "Geoinformatics for Marine and Coastal Management" is comprised of sixteen erudite, informative articles by experts in the field that collectively will provide a timely and valuable assessment of the current state of the art in applying geoinformatics tools and methods to management of marine areas.

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