coastal current

coastal current

[′kōs·təl ′kər·ənt]
(oceanography)
An offshore current flowing generally parallel to the shoreline with a relatively uniform velocity.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Flooding that decades ago usually happened only during a powerful or localized storm can now happen when a steady breeze or a change in coastal current overlaps with a high tide," it read.
This results in a narrow coastal current flowing southwestward along the coast (Blanton et al.
The area where the shark was caught is influenced by the Gulf of California, the Mexican Coastal Current, and the California Current System (Lavin et al., 2009).
The monsoon-driven, seasonally reversing currents alternately export low-salinity BoB water into the Arabian Sea (AS) via the East India Coastal Current (EICC) and Winter Monsoon Current (WMC) and import saltier Arabian Sea water into the BoB via the Summer Monsoon Current (SMC; e.g., Murty et al.
The term was originally used by fishermen of northern Peru to describe a warm southward coastal current that occasionally develops around the Christmas season; thus, the Spanish name referring to the Christ Child.
You can enjoy walking through the old town and arty types will appreciate the Coastal Current Arts Festival.
The 1 and 0.5 NM simulations suggest that the coastal current continues along the Estonian coast through to the entrance to the gulf.
Gerardo Gold, a scientist at the Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN), said spilled crude could easily reach Mexico because of the inversion of the coastal current that normally occurs in August.
Although the study focuses on the Indian Ocean, the researchers believe that similar dynamics could drive coastal current variability in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
They then carefully navigated the glider up onto the shallows and rode in the coastal current north, producing a 230 kilometre alongshore transect-line of date from Deep Glen Bay to the Bay of Fires.
Even today, he says, a seafloor feature about 100 km southwest of the berg-scoured region--a broad area called the Charleston Bump--can cause instabilities in the Gulf Stream that deflect the current offshore for a few weeks at a time, causing reversals in the coastal current. At the height of the last ice age, when sea levels were substantially lower, the Gulf Stream may have been more frequently, if not permanently, deflected offshore.
The Norwegian coastal current; oceanography and climate.

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