coatroom


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Related to coatroom: Coat check room

coatroom

2. A room for the deposit or checking of outer garments.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the coatroom is unattended, the limited liability statute is not applicable.
In the foyer near the coatroom, "Tracks of My Tears" is being rehearsed by a pickup string section, overseen by an older black man in a woolen overcoat.
It is a stunning statistic that Everton haven't finished above their nearest rivals in successive seasons since Cilla was a Cavern coatroom attendant - and Liverpool were back in the Second Division then.
"I don't want it to get wrinkled so I'm going to hang it up in the coatroom."
An atom bomb could explode in that coatroom and we three girls would not budge from our huddle.
Such subsidiary organizations or groups as factory personnel in charge of supplies; personnel in charge of warehouse, garage, parking area, reservoir, stockroom, cattle pen, storage tank, grain elevator, coatroom, waiting room, dock, holding area, airport airway; supply clerks; may be laterally dispersed to departments of an organization; or downwardly to individual persons in it; artifacts like parking lot, barn, silo, warehouse, storage room, closet, file, container.
It has a large sanctuary, with seating for 465 persons, a coatroom and transition and gathering area on the first floor.
She would go into the coatroom and whisper some prayer or other, which made those of us who were her friends slightly embarrassed--for her or for us, I was never sure.
An exit to Broadway had to be navigated through a coatroom in the Broadway Lounge.
The plethora of Browning P35 9mms left by all of Dawkins' officers, in the coatroom inside the door, was obvious proof of that.
Vice President John Adams and Senator Oliver Ellsworth (later Chief Justice of the United States) addressed the question during one sidebar in a congressional coatroom. When it came to the President, they told a colleague in the first Senate, "[y]ou could only impeach him and no other process [w]hatever lay against him."(57) The Senate colleague asked whether this meant that a President could commit "[m]urder in [the] [s]treets" and remain free until impeachment?