coaxial relay

coaxial relay

[kō′ak·sē·əl ′rē‚lā]
(electromagnetism)
A relay designed for opening or closing a coaxial cable circuit without introducing a mismatch that would cause wave reflections.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 GHz coaxial relay designed primarily for mobile communications base station and antenna applications.
RelComm Technologies, Inc, headquartered in Salisbury, Maryland, designs and manufactures application specific RF coaxial relay products for high volume military and commercial communications applications.
Higher frequencies are supported through a range of coaxial relay solutions from DC to 6 GHz and upwards to 65 GHz.
a provider of cable system integration, manufactures and distributes optical transmitters/receivers, optical amplifiers, optical nodes and coaxial relay amplifiers for the delivery of reliable, ultra high-speed data transfer, as well as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services and digital video transmission capacity for over 300 channels through its exceptionally advanced network architecture.
For applications that need a much higher level of isolation, Universal Switching's Series 70000 and RS70000 coaxial relay assemblies are available in configurations from 1x2 up to 1x24.
For added versatility, coaxial relay connections are provided on the front panel and the physical position of each relay can be specified by the customer.
For example, a coaxial relay can have very high-frequency operation with excellent insertion loss and power handling.
As the table shows, nothing compares to an electromechanical coaxial relay for frequency range, insertion loss, and isolation.
To go very much higher in frequency than a few gigahertz and achieve good loss and isolation performance, a coaxial relay is required.
And, at microwave frequencies, bulky coaxial relays are used, which reduce circuit density even more.
Because reed, electromechanical (EM), and coaxial relays all have moving parts, they wear out mechanically.
Very high bandwidths can be achieved using coaxial relays, a subgroup within the overall EM classification.