coaxial relay

coaxial relay

[kō′ak·sē·əl ′rē‚lā]
(electromagnetism)
A relay designed for opening or closing a coaxial cable circuit without introducing a mismatch that would cause wave reflections.
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The most recent relay in this series is the model G9YA, a 26.5 GHz coaxial relay designed primarily for mobile communications base station and antenna applications.
Higher frequencies are supported through a range of coaxial relay solutions from DC to 6 GHz and upwards to 65 GHz."
For applications that need a much higher level of isolation, Universal Switching's Series 70000 and RS70000 coaxial relay assemblies are available in configurations from 1x2 up to 1x24.
For example, a coaxial relay can have very high-frequency operation with excellent insertion loss and power handling.
Type of Switch Coaxial PIN Diode GaAs Low-Power Low-Power Monolithic Switching Speed 1 to 20 ms 1 to 200 ns 1 to 200 ns Frequency Range DC to 40 GHz >Octave >Octave Insertion Loss 0.05 to 0.8 dB 0.8 to 2.0 dB 0.8 to 2.0 dB Isolation 80 to 110 dB 4 to 80 dB 40 to 80 dB VSWR 1.1 to 1.5 1.5 to 2.0 1.5 to 2.0 Relative Cost 1x 2x to 10x 2x to 10x Table 1 RF and Microwave Switch Technology Comparison Courtesy of Dow-Key Microwave As the table shows, nothing compares to an electromechanical coaxial relay for frequency range, insertion loss, and isolation.
To go very much higher in frequency than a few gigahertz and achieve good loss and isolation performance, a coaxial relay is required.
Since previous R&S OSP modules can be used with the new R&S OSP generation, a comprehensive range of modules is available, including RF relays, electromechanical coaxial relays up to 67 GHz, solid-state relays and digital I/O and multiplexer modules.
And, at microwave frequencies, bulky coaxial relays are used, which reduce circuit density even more.
Because reed, electromechanical (EM), and coaxial relays all have moving parts, they wear out mechanically.
Very high bandwidths can be achieved using coaxial relays, a subgroup within the overall EM classification.
Not surprisingly, relatively large armature relays handle power switching at low frequencies, smaller reed relays or FET and solid-state switches are used for general-purpose applications up to a few hundred megahertz, and conventional, large coaxial relays are found at RF and microwave frequencies.
For example, coaxial relays perform the basic circuit make/break function but do so while maintaining a constant characteristic impedance.