cobbler


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cobbler

a person who makes or mends shoes
References in classic literature ?
Hearing himself so called upon, the Cobbler stopped, and, seeing a well-clad stranger in blue, he spoke to him in seemly wise.
At these words the Cobbler's eyes opened big and wide, and his mouth grew round with wonder, like a knothole in a board fence.
"Look ye, now!" said the Cobbler, all drowned in wonder.
"Why, sir," said the cobbler, coughing, "I'm afraid he's done nothing, and won't do anything.
The curate followed the cobbler down a short winding stair which brought them out at an entrance rather higher than the street.
But when the cobbler or any other man whom nature designed to be a trader, having his heart lifted up by wealth or strength or the number of his followers, or any like advantage, attempts to force his way into the class of warriors, or a warrior into that of legislators and guardians, for which he is unfitted, and either to take the implements or the duties of the other; or when one man is trader, legislator, and warrior all in one, then I think you will agree with me in saying that this interchange and this meddling of one with another is the ruin of the State.
And although the French word for shoemaker is different now, there is still a slang word chausseur, meaning a cobbler.
Therefore, if the envious wretch had not left Dort to follow his rival to the Hague in the first place, and then to Gorcum or to Loewestein, -- for the two places are separated only by the confluence of the Waal and the Meuse, -- Van Baerle's letter would have fallen into his hands and not the nurse's: in which event the poor prisoner, like the raven of the Roman cobbler, would have thrown away his time, his trouble, and, instead of having to relate the series of exciting events which are about to flow from beneath our pen like the varied hues of a many coloured tapestry, we should have naught to describe but a weary waste of days, dull and melancholy and gloomy as night's dark mantle.
Sam Weller, in particular, was displaying that beautiful feat of fancy-sliding which is currently denominated 'knocking at the cobbler's door,' and which is achieved by skimming over the ice on one foot, and occasionally giving a postman's knock upon it with the other.
I would mend the tire, having attended ambulance classes, do it very quietly so that she wouldn't hear, like the fairy cobblers who used to mend people's boots while they slept, and then wait in ambush to watch the effect upon her when she awoke.
'When I use it at all, I mostly use it in cobblers' punch.'
'What do you call cobblers' punch?' demanded Wegg, in a worse humour than before.