cocarcinogen


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Related to cocarcinogen: carcinogen

cocarcinogen

[¦kō·kär′sin·ə·jən]
(medicine)
A noncarcinogenic agent which augments the carcinogenic process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(73) Thus, it is possible that SV40 may be required only in the early stages as a cocarcinogen, to protect mesothelial cells against the initial cytotoxic effects of asbestos fiber exposure and for their neoplastic transformation, thereafter being gradually lost owing to its episomal state.
Bosland, M.C 2001 "Arsenite is a cocarcinogen with solar ultraviolet radiation for mouse skin; an animal model for arsenic carcinogenesis".
Consequently, methods of cooking, nitrite concentration, salt concentration, pH and presence of reductants are factors determining the potential production of N-nitrosamines.[2] In addition, nitrite in meats upon ingestion may also produce N-nitrosamines in the stomach or may act as a cocarcinogen. Carcinogenity of N-nitrosamines in a variety of experimental animals such as rodents, fish, etc.
The role of SV40, a virus contaminant in some polio vaccines,63 is not clear, although Kroczynska et al64 recently showed that SV40 is indeed an asbestos cocarcinogen. More study is needed to further elucidate the mechanisms involved in MPM pathophysiology, and the recent development of the National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank, which contains both clinical data and accessibility to human MPM specimens, will be a rich resource for future translational research studies.
Epoxidation of (+/-)-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[[alpha]] pyrene during (bi)sulfite autoxidation: activation of a procarcinogen by a cocarcinogen. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 83(19):7499-7502.
Arsenite is a cocarcinogen with solar ultraviolet radiation for mouse skin: an animal model for arsenic carcinogenesis.
Arsenic is likely a cocarcinogen that inhibits DNA repair and enhances the activity of other directly genotoxic agents (Andrew et al 2003; Beyermann 2002; Rossman et al.
The precise mode of action involved in arsenic-induced cancer has not been established with confidence, but studies suggest that arsenic might act as a cocarcinogen, a promoter, or a progressor (NRC 2001).
Apparently, asbestos plays a cocarcinogen role in lung cancer, with promoter-like activity and synergism with smoking, whereas in mesothelioma it acts as a complete carcinogen.