coccoid


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coccoid

[′kä‚kȯid]
(microbiology)
A spherical bacterial cell.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1930 Dr TJ Glover, working at the Hygienic Laboratory in Washington, found an organism that was shown in subculture to be highly pleomorphic: thus its life cycle included coccoids, rods, mycelial stages and filter passing forms.
These are manganese- and iron-oxidizing bacteria that commonly form a continuous brown-to-black crust of rock varnish on the surface and a layer of cryptoendolithic coccoid cyanobacteria at a depth of 1-3 mm (Friedmann et al., 1967).
Properties of new strains belonging to U2 B76 R-25 Gram reaction + + Shape rod coccoid Size 0.5 x 0.8 [micro]m 0.8 [micro]m Growth Glucose + + Xylose + + Arabinose + + Cellobiose + + Avicel - - Enzyme activities CMCase - + Xylanase + + Arabinofuranosidase + +
A revision of the gall-forming coccoid genus Apiomorpha Rubsaaman (Homoptera: Eriococcidae: Apiomorphinae).
At day 4pi, animals C1V1 and C2V2 had acanthosis, mild multifocal acantholysis and moderate focal hyperkeratosis, with focally extensive loss of epidermal layers (ulcer) and focally extensive necrosis with intralesional aggregate of basophilic coccoid bacteria (Figure 2A e 2C).
A chronic, active, partly necrotic, partly granulomatous osteitis, osteomyelitis, and myositis was detected in the area of T5-7 with intralesional coccoid bacteria and a focal pathologic fracture (Fig 4B).
This small pleomorphic gram negative coccoid bacterium appears intracytoplasmically with in monocytes and macrophages.
During the following decade, additional clinical isolates with the same microbiological characteristics (slow-growing, gram-negative, small coccoid, asaccharolytic, oxidase negative, nonmotile and brown-soluble-pigment-producing) were submitted to the CDC for identification (10).
In the outermost zone, large coccoid symbionts are digested and host cells undergo programmed cell death via apoptosis.
The contribution of microbial mats (coccoid and filamentous bacteria) has been directly observed in the preservation of tissue imprints in fish eyes (Gupta et al., 2008) and in the dinosaur Pelecanimimus polyodon (Briggs et al., 1997).