cockney


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cockney

1. a native of London, esp of the working class born in the East End, speaking a characteristic dialect of English. Traditionally defined as someone born within the sound of the bells of St. Mary-le-Bow church
2. Austral a young snapper fish
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Cockney

Bow Bells
famous bell in East End of London; “only one who is born within the bell’s sound is a true Cockney.” [Br. Hist.: NCE, 347]
Doolittle, Eliza
Cockney girl taught by professor to imitate aristocracy. [Br. Lit.: Pygmalion]
Weller, Tony and Samuel
father and son, coachman and bootblack, with colorful lingo. [Br. Lit.: Dickens Pickwick Papers]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
I, and I suspect many more real East Enders, are royally hacked off with the cor-blimey patter and central casting caricature of everyman's Cockney that he seems to revel in.
I was asked to when I got join Cockney on stage believe it.'s a dream come true for Amelia who is studying French, Spanish and Russian at Nottingham University.
Speaking at the Radio Times Festival, he said he recently used the term "Brady bunch" in the soap which is cockney rhyming slang for lunch - but admits he sometimes makes words up which lead to people Googling them.
Cockney Sparrow, who was preparing to come back into training, began showing signs of colic on Monday.
Cockney is a member of the men's cross-country skiing team.
"In particular, we were investigating why certain linguistic factors normally found within the Cockney dialect were gradually entering into Glaswegian.
It is true that while the rhyming slang word 'brassic' is derived from 'boracic lint', the most accurate phonetic spelling of how the Cockneys choose to pronounce it is in fact 'brassic'.
The Adidas b ll has been named The Albert, as in the Cockney rhy ing ball has been named The Albert, as in the Cockney rhyming slang Albert Hall, ball!
London, July 6 ( ANI ): Our insatiable fascination with celebrities is helping reinvent the cockney rhyming slang, an ancient argot that many language experts feared was dying out.
AS a lover of language, I was slightly disturbed to read that Cockney rhyming slang was not just in decline, but dying out, almost 'brown bread'.
Though Blackwood's was often a mercurial, unstable magazine, during this decade it consistently defined itself in opposition to what it termed "Cockney" writers.