cocooning


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cocooning

Staying at home and isolated from others physically. Coined in the 1990s by Faith Popcorn, CEO of marketing consultancy BrainReserve, electronic devices enable people to purchase everything imaginable and communicate with anyone and everyone without leaving one's habitat. In addition, since 911, some people fear congregating in crowds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presenting the conclusions of ACIP's pertussis vaccines work group review on the impact of cocooning strategies, Dr.
In 2005, ACIP recommended the "cocooning" strategy: vaccinating with Tdap for all close contacts of infants under age 12 months to reduce the risk of transmitting pertussis, including parents, siblings, grandparents, child care providers, and health care personnel, in addition to vaccinating pregnant women immediately post partum.
The cocooning process also involved isolating the Heat Exchange Facility, an adjacent structure that contained the steam generators for producing electricity.
During the $65 million cocooning project, the reactor building was demolished down to its concrete shield walls surrounding the reactor core.
"Furthermore, because Free Form Aisle Cocooning enables an
Cocooning has been recommended since 2005, but available data show poor uptake and no evidence that cocooning programs are sustainable, she said.
And it's not just 2001's events that are shaping the cocooning trend, she explained.
Cocooning is a concept Popcorn defines as the need to protect oneself from the harsh and unpredictable realities of the outside world.
The furniture will be designed around Popcorn's cocooning concept, which is a natural fit with the motion and bedding categories, Levine pointed out.
According to Salvo Stoch, president, "The pricing of the way we do the baby line is almost on custom level." Pricing of the Cocooning line will be approximately 30 percent less, he said.